UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
 

FORM N-CSR 

CERTIFIED SHAREHOLDER REPORT OF REGISTERED MANAGEMENT INVESTMENT COMPANIES 

Investment Company Act file number811-22328 

Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in charter) 

290 Congress Street, Boston, MA 02210

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip code)
 

Daniel J. Beckman
c/o Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC
290 Congress Street 

Boston, MA 02210 

  

Ryan C. Larrenaga, Esq. 

c/o Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC 

290 Congress Street 

Boston, MA 02210
  
(Name and address of agent for service)
 

Registrant's telephone number, including area code:   (800) 345-6611 

Date of fiscal year end:  December 31 

Date of reporting period:  December 31, 2021 

Form N-CSR is to be used by management investment companies to file reports with the Commission not later than 10 days after the transmission to stockholders of any report that is required to be transmitted to stockholders under Rule 30e-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (17 CFR 270.30e-1). The Commission may use the information provided on Form N-CSR in its regulatory, disclosure review, inspection, and policymaking roles. 

 

A registrant is required to disclose the information specified by Form N-CSR, and the Commission will make this information public. A registrant is not required to respond to the collection of information contained in Form N-CSR unless the Form displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget ("OMB") control number. Please direct comments concerning the accuracy of the information collection burden estimate and any suggestions for reducing the burden to Secretary, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. The OMB has reviewed this collection of information under the clearance requirements of 44 U.S.C. § 3507. 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Explanatory Note 

  

On March 3, 2022, the undersigned registrant filed its Certified Shareholder Report on Form N-CSR for the annual period ended December 31, 2021.  The registrant hereby amends the original filing Item 4.a Principal Accountant Fees and Services – Audit Fees to correct the prior year (2020) audit fee amount. 

This amendment does not reflect events occurring after the filing of the original Certified Shareholder Report on Form N-CSR for the annual period ended December 31, 2021, and, other than supplementing Item 4 “Principal Accountant Fees and Services,” as stated above, does not modify or update the disclosures in the original Certified Shareholder Report on Form N-CSR in any way. 

  

Item 1. Reports to Stockholders. 


Annual Report
December 31, 2021
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.
Not Federally Insured • No Financial Institution Guaranteed • May Lose Value

Under the managed distribution policy of Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. (the Fund) and subject to the approval of the Fund’s Board of Directors (the Board), the Fund expects to make quarterly cash distributions (in February, May, August and November) to holders of common stock (Common Stockholders). The Fund’s most recent distribution under its managed distribution policy (paid on February 22, 2022) amounted to $0.4625 per share, which is equal to a quarterly rate of 1.3960% (5.58% annualized) of the Fund’s market price of $33.13 per share as of January 31, 2022. On January 18, 2022, the Fund also paid a special fourth quarter distribution, beyond its typical quarterly managed distribution policy, in the amount of $1.2869 per share of common stock to stockholders of record on December 13, 2021. You should not draw any conclusions about the Fund’s investment performance from the amount of the distributions or from the terms of the Fund’s managed distribution policy. Historically, the Fund has at times distributed more than its income and net realized capital gains, which has resulted in Fund distributions substantially consisting of return of capital or other capital source. A return of capital may occur, for example, when some or all of the money that you invested in the Fund is paid back to you. A return of capital distribution does not necessarily reflect the Fund’s investment performance and should not be confused with ‘yield’ or ‘income’. The Fund’s Board may determine in the future that the Fund’s managed distribution policy and the amount or timing of the distributions should not be continued in light of changes in the Fund’s portfolio holdings, market or other conditions or factors, including that the distribution rate under such policy may not be dependent upon the amount of the Fund’s earned income or realized capital gains. The Board could also consider amending or terminating the current managed distribution policy because of potential adverse tax consequences associated with maintaining the policy. In certain situations, returns of capital could be taxable for federal income tax purposes, and all or a portion of the Fund’s capital loss carryforwards from prior years, if any, could effectively be forfeited. The Board may amend or terminate the Fund’s managed distribution policy at any time without prior notice to Fund stockholders; any such change or termination may have an adverse effect on the market price of the Fund’s shares.
See Notes to Financial Statements for additional information related to the Fund’s managed distribution policy.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.   |  Annual Report 2021

Letter to the Stockholders
Dear Stockholders,
We are pleased to present the annual stockholder report for Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. (the Fund). The report includes the Fund’s investment results, a discussion with the Fund’s portfolio managers, the portfolio of investments and financial statements as of December 31, 2021.
The Fund’s common shares (Common Stock) returned 39.38%, based on net asset value, and 48.96%, based on market price, for the 12 months ended December 31, 2021. In comparison, the Fund’s benchmark, the S&P North American Technology Sector Index, returned 26.40% for the same time period.
During 2021, the Fund paid four distributions in accordance with its managed distribution policy that aggregated to $1.85 per share of Common Stock of the Fund. On January 18, 2022, the Fund also paid a special fourth quarter distribution, beyond its typical quarterly managed distribution policy, in the amount of $1.2869 per share of Common Stock to stockholders of record on December 13, 2021. The Fund has exemptive relief from the Securities and Exchange Commission that permits the Fund to make periodic distributions of long-term capital gains more often than once in any one taxable year. Unless you elected otherwise, distributions were paid in additional shares of the Fund.
The Board appointed Douglas A. Hacker to the Fund’s Board. His service with the Fund began effective January 1, 2022 for a term expiring at the 2025 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. Mr. Hacker currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the mutual funds and exchange-traded funds within the Columbia Funds Complex (the Columbia Funds Board) and, effective January 1, 2022, on the board of another Columbia closed-end fund. 
Information about the Fund, including daily pricing, current performance, Fund holdings, stockholder reports, distributions and other information can be found at columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/ under the Closed-End Funds tab.
On behalf of the Board, I would like to thank you for your continued support of Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.
Regards,
Catherine James Paglia
Chair of the BoardFor more information, go online to columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/; or call American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC, the Fund’s Stockholder Servicing Agent, at 866.666.1532. Customer Service Representatives are available to answer your questions Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.   |  Annual Report 2021

Table of Contents
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. (the Fund) mails one stockholder report to each stockholder address. If you would like more than one report, please call shareholder services at 800.937.5449 and additional reports will be sent to you.
Proxy voting policies and procedures
The policy of the Board is to vote the proxies of the companies in which the Fund holds investments consistent with the procedures that can be found by visiting columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/. Information regarding how the Fund voted proxies relating to portfolio securities is filed with the SEC by August 31 for the most recent 12-month period ending June 30 of that year, and is available without charge by visiting columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/; or searching the website of the SEC at sec.gov.
Quarterly schedule of investments
The Fund files a complete schedule of portfolio holdings with the SEC for the first and third quarters of each fiscal year on Form N-PORT. The Fund’s Form N-PORT filings are available on the SEC’s website at sec.gov. The Fund’s complete schedule of portfolio holdings, as filed on Form N-PORT, can also be obtained without charge, upon request, by calling 800.937.5449.
Additional Fund information
For more information, go online to columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/; or call American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC, the Fund’s Stockholder Servicing Agent, at 866.666.1532. Customer Service Representatives are available to answer your questions Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time.
Fund investment manager
Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (the Investment Manager)
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
Fund transfer agent
American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC
6201 15th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11219
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  |  Annual Report 2021

Fund at a Glance
Investment objective
The Fund seeks growth of capital and current income.
Portfolio management
Paul Wick
Lead Portfolio Manager
Managed Fund since 2009
Braj Agrawal
Co-Portfolio Manager
Managed Fund since 2010
Christopher Boova
Co-Portfolio Manager
Managed Fund since 2016
Jeetil Patel
Technology Team Member
Managed Fund since 2015
Vimal Patel
Technology Team Member
Managed Fund since 2018
Shekhar Pramanick
Technology Team Member
Managed Fund since 2018
Morningstar style boxTM
The Morningstar Style Box is based on a fund’s portfolio holdings. For equity funds, the vertical axis shows the market capitalization of the stocks owned, and the horizontal axis shows investment style (value, blend, or growth). Information shown is based on the most recent data provided by Morningstar.
© 2022 Morningstar, Inc. All rights reserved. The Morningstar information contained herein: (1) is proprietary to Morningstar and/or its content providers; (2) may not be copied or distributed; and (3) is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. Neither Morningstar nor its content providers are responsible for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information.
Average annual total returns (%) (for the period ended December 31, 2021)
    Inception 1 Year 5 Years 10 Years
Market Price 11/24/09 48.96 26.97 21.39
Net Asset Value 11/30/09 39.38 27.19 19.78
S&P North American Technology Sector Index   26.40 29.99 23.54
The performance information shown represents past performance and is not a guarantee of future results. The investment return and principal value of your investment will fluctuate so that your shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance information shown. You may obtain performance information current to the most recent month-end by visiting columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/.
Returns reflect changes in market price or net asset value, as applicable, and assume reinvestment of distributions. Returns do not reflect the deduction of taxes that investors may pay on distributions or the sale of shares.
The S&P North American Technology Sector Index is an unmanaged modified capitalization-weighted index based on a universe of technology-related stocks.
Indices are not available for investment, are not professionally managed and do not reflect sales charges, fees, brokerage commissions, taxes or other expenses of investing. Securities in the Fund may not match those in an index.
Fund performance may be significantly negatively impacted by the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted economies and capital markets around the world in ways that will likely continue and may change in unforeseen ways for an indeterminate period. The COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate pre-existing political, social and economic risks in certain countries and globally.
Price Per Share
  December 31, 2021 September 30, 2021 June 30, 2021 March 31, 2021
Market Price ($) 37.01 32.97 35.51 31.24
Net Asset Value ($) 35.42 32.43 33.74 31.12
    
Distributions Paid Per Common Share
Payable Date Per Share Amount ($)
February 23, 2021 0.4625
May 25, 2021 0.4625
August 24, 2021 0.4625
November 23, 2021 0.4625
January 18, 2022 1.2869(a)
(a) The Fund paid this special 2021 fourth quarter distribution beyond its typical quarterly managed distribution policy to stockholders of record on December 13, 2021.
The net asset value of the Fund’s shares may not always correspond to the market price of such shares. Common stock of many closed-end funds frequently trade at a discount from their net asset value. The Fund is subject to stock market risk, which is the risk that stock prices overall will decline over short or long periods, adversely affecting the value of an investment in the Fund.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
3

Fund at a Glance   (continued)
Performance of a hypothetical $10,000 investment (December 31, 2011 — December 31, 2021)
The chart above shows the change in value of a hypothetical $10,000 investment in Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. during the stated time period, and does not reflect the deduction of taxes that a shareholder may pay on Fund distributions or on the sale of Fund shares.
Portfolio breakdown (%) (at December 31, 2021)
Common Stocks 97.9
Money Market Funds 2.1
Total 100.0
Percentages indicated are based upon total investments excluding investments in derivatives, if any. The Fund’s portfolio composition is subject to change.
Equity sector breakdown (%) (at December 31, 2021)
Communication Services 9.4
Consumer Discretionary 2.3
Health Care 0.1
Industrials 2.1
Information Technology 86.1
Total 100.0
Percentages indicated are based upon total equity investments. The Fund’s portfolio composition is subject to change.
Equity sub-industry breakdown (%) (at December 31, 2021)
Information Technology  
Application Software 9.0
Communications Equipment 6.1
Data Processing & Outsourced Services 4.0
Electronic Equipment & Instruments 1.4
Internet Services & Infrastructure 1.6
IT Consulting & Other Services 0.8
Semiconductor Equipment 15.1
Semiconductors 23.5
Systems Software 12.3
Technology Hardware, Storage & Peripherals 12.3
Total 86.1
Percentages indicated are based upon total equity investments. The Fund’s portfolio composition is subject to change.
 
4 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Manager Discussion of Fund Performance
For the 12-month period that ended December 31, 2021, shares of the Fund returned 48.96% at market price and 39.38% at net asset value. The Fund significantly outperformed its benchmark, the S&P North American Technology Sector Index, which returned 26.40% for the same time period.
Market overview
U.S. equities displayed remarkable resilience during the year, finishing with a solid gain despite a number of potential headwinds. Investors had to contend with the emergence of the Omicron variant of COVID-19, which was contagious enough to raise concerns that a new wave of lockdowns could be necessary. The markets also faced a major shift in U.S. Federal Reserve policy. Whereas the Fed had previously viewed rising inflation as a transitory development, continued price pressures caused the central bank to announce the tapering of its stimulative quantitative easing program. In addition, it began to prepare the financial markets for the likelihood of multiple interest rate increases in 2022. The failure of the Build Back Better bill removed a source of anticipated fiscal stimulus. Nevertheless, most major U.S. indices closed the year at or near their all-time highs on the strength of robust investment inflows and the lack of compelling total return potential in bonds.
In a continuation of a long-standing trend, mega-cap technology-related stocks were the key drivers of market performance. In contrast, smaller companies managed only narrow gains. While the large-cap Russell 1000 Index rose 26.45% in 2021, the small-cap Russell 2000 Index advanced 14.82%. The ongoing dominance of technology stocks also led to outperformance for the growth style within the large-cap space. The Russell 1000 Growth Index returned 27.60% for the year, outpacing the 25.16% gain for the Russell 1000 Value Index. However, this trend did not hold with regard to smaller cap stocks, as the value style outperformed growth by a wide margin, with the Russell 2000 Value Index returning 28.27% and the Russell 2000 Growth Index returning 2.83% for the year.
Within the benchmark, the semiconductors & semiconductor equipment, communications equipment, communication services, interactive media & services and technology hardware storage & peripherals industries outperformed while the IT services, internet & direct marketing retail and software industries lagged for the reporting period.
The Fund’s notable contributors during the period
The Fund’s significant outperformance of the benchmark during the period was driven by strong stock selection, most notably within the semiconductors & semiconductor equipment and software industries.
Top individual contributors included:
Internet of Things (IoT) chip company Synaptics, Inc. was a top contributor after executing a turnaround over the past two years under the guidance of CEO Michael Hurlston. The company once known for touchpads and other interface components for PCs and mobile phones jettisoned its smartphone centric fingerprint sensor and LCD touch / display drive IC (integrated circuit) businesses while making strategic acquisitions in video and wireless connectivity and PC docking station technology which significantly boosted margins and profit growth.  In 2021, the company consistently beat earnings expectations and the stock responded in kind. 
Top holdings in semi-cap equipment companies Lam Research Corp. and Applied Materials, Inc. contributed meaningfully to returns during the period. The global semiconductor shortage highlights the fact that the industry needs to add capacity to inevitably boost supply. Our investments in semiconductor capital equipment companies have benefited from this pressing need.
Within software, cybersecurity holdings Fortinet, Inc. and Palo Alto Networks, Inc. benefited from strong demand for protection against hackers and ransomware.
Allocation decisions were also positive. The Fund’s sizable overweight to the semiconductor & semiconductor equipment industry, the strongest performing area of the benchmark, boosted relative results. An overweight to communications equipment was also additive, as was the Fund’s underweight to the poor-performing IT services industry and the consumer discretionary sector.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
5

Manager Discussion of Fund Performance  (continued)
The Fund’s notable detractors during the period
The largest area of detraction for the Fund during the period came from the industrials sector. Overall, the sector was one of the bottom performing areas of the benchmark and the Fund’s overweight weighed on relative performance.
The electronic equipment instruments and components industry was another area of underperformance for the Fund, both on an absolute and relative basis.
Microsoft Corp. continued to perform well due to high demand for its cloud-based offering Azure and strength in the company’s Office360 suite of products. Microsoft represents a large weighting in the benchmark and the portfolio’s relative underweight detracted from relative returns.
In the industrials sector, an out-of-benchmark holding in Bloom Energy Corp. underperformed, along with other Alternative Energy stocks, despite having signed a multi-year, $4.5 billion contract to supply SK Group of Korea with fuel cells.
Software holding Cerence Inc. detracted during the period. The company has seen a lull in its business due to the supply shortage induced problems in the auto industry.
Not owning semiconductor company NVIDIA  Corp. on valuation concerns hurt relative performance as the stock rallied on strong results from the company’s gaming business as customers upgraded to its latest graphics cards.
Call options contributed to returns
Although there were strong results for technology stocks, especially in November 2021, and relatively constant volatility for both technology and technology-related stocks, the Fund’s call option writing strategy added to returns.
The views expressed in this report reflect the current views of the respective parties. These views are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict, so actual outcomes and results may differ significantly from the views expressed. These views are subject to change at any time based upon economic, market or other conditions and the respective parties disclaim any responsibility to update such views. These views may not be relied on as investment advice and, because investment decisions for a Columbia fund are based on numerous factors, may not be relied on as an indication of trading intent on behalf of any particular Columbia fund. References to specific securities should not be construed as a recommendation or investment advice.
6 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks
(Unaudited)
Fund Investment Objective
The Fund’s investment objective is to seek growth of capital and current income. The Fund’s investment objective is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board without approval of the Fund’s stockholders.
Fund Investment Strategies and Policies
Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its “Managed Assets” (as defined below) in a portfolio of equity securities of technology and technology-related companies that Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (the Investment Manager) believes offer attractive opportunities for capital appreciation. Under normal market conditions, the Fund’s investment program consists primarily of (i) investing in a portfolio of equity securities of technology and technology-related companies that seeks to exceed the total return, before fees and expenses, of the S&P North American Technology Sector Index and (ii) writing call options on the NASDAQ 100 Index®, an unmanaged index that includes the largest and most active non-financial domestic and international companies listed on the NASDAQ Stock Market, or its exchange-traded fund equivalent (the NASDAQ 100) on a month-to-month basis, with an aggregate notional amount typically ranging from 0%-90% of the underlying value of the Fund’s holdings of common stock (the Rules-based Option Strategy, as further described below). The Fund expects to generate current income from premiums received from writing call options on the NASDAQ 100.
In determining the level (i.e., 0% to 90%) of call options to be written on the NASDAQ 100, the Investment Manager’s Rules-based Option Strategy is based on the CBOE NASDAQ-100 Volatility IndexSM (the VXN Index). The VXN Index measures the market’s expectation of 30-day volatility implicit in the prices of near-term NASDAQ 100 Index options. The VXN Index, which is quoted in percentage points (e.g., 19.36), is a leading barometer of investor sentiment and market volatility relating to the NASDAQ 100 Index. In general, the Investment Manager intends to write more call options when market volatility, as represented by the VXN Index, is high (and premiums received for writing the option are high) and write fewer call options when market volatility, as represented by the VXN Index, is low (and premiums for writing the option are low).
The Fund’s Rules-based Option Strategy with respect to writing call options is as follows:
When the VXN Index is: Aggregate Notional Amount of
Written Call Options as a
Percentage of the Fund’s
Holdings in Common Stocks
17 or less 25%
Greater than 17, but less than 18 Increase up to 50%
At least 18, but less than 33 50%
At least 33, but less than 34 Increase up to 90%
At least 34, but less than 55 90%
At 55 or greater 0% to 90%
In addition to the Rules-based Option Strategy, the Fund may write additional calls with aggregate notional amounts of up to 25% of the value of the Fund’s holdings in common stock (to a maximum of 90% when aggregated with the call options written pursuant to the Rules-based Option Strategy) when the Investment Manager believes call premiums are attractive relative to the risk of the price of the NASDAQ 100. The Fund may also close (or buy back) a written call option if the Investment Manager believes that a substantial amount of the premium (typically, 70% or more) to be received by the Fund has been captured before exercise, potentially reducing the call position to 0% of total equity until additional calls are written. The Fund may also buy or write other call and put options on securities, indices, ETFs and market baskets of securities to generate additional income or return or to provide the portfolio with downside protection.
The Fund’s investment policy of investing at least 80% of its Managed Assets in equity securities of technology and technology-related companies and its policy with respect to the use of the Rules-based Option Strategy on a month-to-month basis may be changed by the Board without stockholder approval only following the provision of 60 days’ prior written notice to stockholders.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
7

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
The Fund is a non-diversified fund. A non-diversified fund is permitted to invest a greater percentage of its total assets in fewer issuers than a diversified fund. This policy may not be changed without a stockholder vote.
The Fund has a fundamental policy of investing at least 25% of its total assets in securities principally engaged in technology and technology-related stocks. This policy may not be changed without a stockholder vote.
The Fund may also invest: up to 15% of its Managed Assets in illiquid securities (i.e., securities that at the time of purchase are not readily marketable); up to 20% of its Managed Assets in debt securities (including convertible and non-convertible debt securities), such as debt securities issued by technology and technology-related companies and obligations of the U.S. Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, and government-sponsored enterprises, as well as below-investment grade securities (i.e., high-yield or junk bonds); and up to 25% of its Managed Assets in equity securities of companies organized outside of the United States. The Fund may hold foreign securities of issuers located or doing substantial business in emerging markets. Each of these policies may be changed by the Board without stockholder approval. 
The Fund has other fundamental policies that may not be changed without a stockholder vote. Under these policies, the Fund may not:
Purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts, except to the extent permissible under applicable law and interpretations, as they may be amended from time to time, and except this shall not prevent the Fund from buying or selling options, futures contracts and foreign currency or from entering into forward currency contracts or from investing in securities or other instruments backed by, or whose value is derived from, physical commodities;
Issue senior securities or borrow money, except as permitted by the Investment Company Act or any rule thereunder, any SEC or SEC staff interpretations thereof or any exemptions therefrom which may be granted by the SEC;
Make loans, except as permitted by the Investment Company Act or any rule thereunder, any SEC or SEC staff interpretations thereof or any exemptions therefrom which may be granted by the SEC;
Underwrite the securities of other issuers, except insofar as the Fund may be deemed an underwriter under the Securities Act of 1933 in disposing of a portfolio security or in connection with investments in other investment companies;
Buy or sell real estate, unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments, except this shall not prevent the Fund from investing in securities or other instruments backed by real estate or securities of companies engaged in the real estate business or real estate investment trusts; and
Invest 25% or more of its Managed Assets (as defined below), at market value, in the securities of issuers in any particular industry, except that the Fund will invest at least 25% of the value of its Managed Assets in technology and technology-related stocks (in which the Fund intends to concentrate) and may invest without limit in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government, its agencies or instrumentalities, or government-sponsored enterprises.
“Managed Assets” means the net asset value of the Fund’s outstanding common stock plus any liquidation preference of any issued and outstanding Fund preferred stock and the principal amount of any borrowings used for leverage.
The Fund’s fundamental policies set forth above prohibit transactions “except as permitted by the Investment Company Act or any rule thereunder, any SEC or SEC staff interpretations thereof or any exemptions therefrom which may be granted by the SEC.” The reference to the Investment Company Act, means the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, and the reference to the SEC means the Securities and Exchange Commission. The following discussion explains the flexibility that the Fund gains from these exceptions.
Issuing senior securities — A “senior security” is an obligation with respect to the earnings or assets of a company that takes precedence over the claims of that company’s common stock with respect to the same earnings or assets. The Investment Company Act limits the ability of a closed-end fund to issue senior securities, but SEC staff interpretations allow a fund to engage in certain types of transactions that otherwise might raise senior security concerns (such as short sales, buying and selling financial futures contracts and selling put and call options), provided that the Fund maintains segregated
8 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
deposits or portfolio securities, or otherwise covers the transaction with offsetting portfolio securities, in amounts sufficient to offset any liability associated with the transaction. The exception in the fundamental policy allows the Fund to operate in reliance upon these staff interpretations.
Borrowing money — The Investment Company Act permits the Fund to borrow up to 33 1/3% of its Managed Assets, plus an additional 5% of its Managed Assets for temporary purposes.
Making loans — The Investment Company Act generally prohibits the Fund from making loans to affiliated persons but does not otherwise restrict the Fund’s ability to make loans.
Under the Investment Company Act, the Fund’s fundamental policies may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a “majority of the outstanding” common stock and, if issued, preferred stock voting together as a single class, and of the holders of a “majority of the outstanding” preferred stock voting as a separate class. When used with respect to particular shares of the Fund, a “majority of the outstanding” shares means the lesser of: (i) 67% or more of the shares present at a stockholder meeting, if the holders of more than 50% of the outstanding shares are present at the meeting or represented by proxy, or (ii) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund.
Principal Risks
An investment in the Fund involves risks. In particular, investors should consider Market Risk, Information Technology  Sector Risk, and Derivatives Risk. Descriptions of these and other principal risks of investing in the Fund are provided below. There is no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective and you may lose money. The value of the Fund’s holdings may decline, and the Fund’s net asset value (NAV) and share price may go down. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. See also the Fund’s "Significant Risks" in the Notes to Financial Statements section.
Active Management Risk. The Fund is actively managed and its performance therefore will reflect, in part, the ability of the portfolio managers to make investment decisions that seek to achieve the Fund’s investment objective. Due to its active management, the Fund could underperform its benchmark index and/or other funds with similar investment objectives and/or strategies.
Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that the value of debt instruments may decline if the issuer thereof defaults or otherwise becomes unable or unwilling, or is perceived to be unable or unwilling, to honor its financial obligations, such as making payments to the Fund when due. Various factors could affect the actual or perceived willingness or ability of the issuer to make timely interest or principal payments, including changes in the financial condition of the issuer or in general economic conditions. Credit rating agencies, such as S&P Global Ratings, Moody’s, Fitch, DBRS and KBRA, (as applicable), assign credit ratings to certain debt instruments to indicate their credit risk. A rating downgrade by such agencies can negatively impact the value of such instruments. Lower rated or unrated instruments held by the Fund may present increased credit risk as compared to higher-rated instruments. Non-investment grade debt instruments may be subject to greater price fluctuations and are more likely to experience a default than investment grade debt instruments and therefore may expose the Fund to increased credit risk. If the Fund purchases unrated instruments, or if the ratings of instruments held by the Fund are lowered after purchase, the Fund will depend on analysis of credit risk more heavily than usual.
Derivatives Risk. Derivatives may involve significant risks. Derivatives are financial instruments, traded on an exchange or in the over-the-counter (OTC) markets, with a value in relation to, or derived from, the value of an underlying asset(s) (such as a security, commodity or currency) or other reference, such as an index, rate or other economic indicator (each an underlying reference). Derivatives may include those that are privately placed or otherwise exempt from SEC registration, including certain Rule 144A eligible securities. Derivatives could result in Fund losses if the underlying reference does not perform as anticipated. Use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that can involve investment techniques, risks, and tax planning different from those associated with more traditional investment instruments. The Fund’s derivatives strategy may not be successful and use of certain derivatives could result in substantial, potentially unlimited, losses to the Fund regardless of the Fund’s actual investment. A relatively small movement in the price, rate or other economic indicator associated with the underlying reference may result in substantial losses for the Fund. Derivatives may be more volatile than other types of
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
9

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
investments. Derivatives can increase the Fund’s risk exposure to underlying references and their attendant risks, including the risk of an adverse credit event associated with the underlying reference (credit risk), the risk of an adverse movement in the value, price or rate of the underlying reference (market risk), the risk of an adverse movement in the value of underlying currencies (foreign currency risk) and the risk of an adverse movement in underlying interest rates (interest rate risk). Derivatives may expose the Fund to additional risks, including the risk of loss due to a derivative position that is imperfectly correlated with the underlying reference it is intended to hedge or replicate (correlation risk), the risk that a counterparty will fail to perform as agreed (counterparty risk), the risk that a hedging strategy may fail to mitigate losses, and may offset gains (hedging risk), the risk that the return on an investment may not keep pace with inflation (inflation risk), the risk that losses may be greater than the amount invested (leverage risk), the risk that the Fund may be unable to sell an investment at an advantageous time or price (liquidity risk), the risk that the investment may be difficult to value (pricing risk), and the risk that the price or value of the investment fluctuates significantly over short periods of time (volatility risk). The value of derivatives may be influenced by a variety of factors, including national and international political and economic developments. Potential changes to the regulation of the derivatives markets may make derivatives more costly, may limit the market for derivatives, or may otherwise adversely affect the value or performance of derivatives.
Derivatives Risk – Options Risk. Options are derivatives that give the purchaser the option to buy (call) or sell (put) an underlying reference from or to a counterparty at a specified price (the strike price) on or before an expiration date. The Fund may purchase or write (i.e., sell) put and call options on an underlying reference it is otherwise permitted to invest in. When writing options, the Fund is exposed to the risk that it may be required to buy or sell the underlying reference at a disadvantageous price on or before the expiration date. If the Fund sells a put option, the Fund may be required to buy the underlying reference at a strike price that is above market price, resulting in a loss. If the Fund sells a call option, the Fund may be required to sell the underlying reference at a strike price that is below market price, resulting in a loss. If the Fund sells a call option that is not covered (it does not own the underlying reference), the Fund’s losses are potentially unlimited. Options may involve economic leverage, which could result in greater volatility in price movement. Options may be traded on a securities exchange or in the over-the-counter market. At or prior to maturity of an options contract, the Fund may enter into an offsetting contract and may incur a loss to the extent there has been adverse movement in options prices. Options can increase the Fund’s risk exposure to underlying references and their attendant risks such as credit risk, market risk, foreign currency risk and interest rate risk, while also exposing the Fund to correlation risk, counterparty risk, hedging risk, inflation risk, leverage risk, liquidity risk, pricing risk and volatility risk.
Emerging Market Securities Risk. Securities issued by foreign governments or companies in emerging market countries, such as China, Russia and certain countries in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America or Africa, are more likely to have greater exposure to the risks of investing in foreign securities that are described in Foreign Securities Risk. In addition, emerging market countries are more likely to experience instability resulting, for example, from rapid changes or developments in social, political, economic or other conditions. Their economies are usually less mature and their securities markets are typically less developed with more limited trading activity (i.e., lower trading volumes and less liquidity) than more developed countries. Emerging market securities tend to be more volatile, and may be more susceptible to market manipulation, than securities in more developed markets. Many emerging market countries are heavily dependent on international trade and have fewer trading partners, which makes them more sensitive to world commodity prices and economic downturns in other countries. Some emerging market countries have a higher risk of currency devaluations, and some of these countries may experience periods of high inflation or rapid changes in inflation rates and may have hostile relations with other countries. Due to the differences in the nature and quality of financial information of issuers of emerging market securities, including auditing and financial reporting standards, financial information and disclosures about such issuers may be unavailable or, if made available, may be considerably less reliable than publicly available information about other foreign securities.
Foreign Securities Risk. Investments in or exposure to foreign companies involve certain risks not associated with investments in or exposure to securities of U.S. companies. For example, foreign markets can be extremely volatile. Foreign securities may also be less liquid, making them more difficult to trade, than securities of U.S. companies so that the Fund may, at times, be unable to sell foreign securities at desirable times or prices. Brokerage commissions, custodial costs and other fees are also generally higher for foreign securities. The Fund may have limited or no legal recourse in the event of default with respect to certain foreign securities, including those issued by foreign governments. In addition, foreign
10 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
governments may impose withholding or other taxes on the Fund’s income, capital gains or proceeds from the disposition of foreign securities, which could reduce the Fund’s return on such securities. In some cases, such withholding or other taxes could potentially be confiscatory. Other risks include: possible delays in the settlement of transactions or in the payment of income; generally less publicly available information about foreign companies; the impact of economic, political, social, diplomatic or other conditions or events (including, for example, military confrontations, war, terrorism and disease/virus outbreaks and epidemics), possible seizure, expropriation or nationalization of a company or its assets or the assets of a particular investor or category of investors; accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards that may be less comprehensive and stringent than those applicable to domestic companies; the imposition of economic and other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals or industries or businesses within the country; and the generally less stringent standard of care to which local agents may be held in the local markets. In addition, it may be difficult to obtain reliable information about the securities and business operations of certain foreign issuers. Governments or trade groups may compel local agents to hold securities in designated depositories that are not subject to independent evaluation. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the level of risks. Economic sanctions may be, and have been, imposed against certain countries, organizations, companies, entities and/or individuals. Economic sanctions and other similar governmental actions could, among other things, effectively restrict or eliminate the Fund’s ability to purchase or sell securities, and thus may make the Fund’s investments in such securities less liquid or more difficult to value. In addition, as a result of economic sanctions, the Fund may be forced to sell or otherwise dispose of investments at inopportune times or prices, which could result in losses to the Fund and increased transaction costs. These conditions may be in place for a substantial period of time and enacted with limited advance notice to the Fund. The risks posed by sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals or industries or businesses within the country may be heightened to the extent the Fund invests significantly in the affected country or region or in issuers from the affected country that depend on global markets. Additionally, investments in certain countries may subject the Fund to a number of tax rules, the application of which may be uncertain. Countries may amend or revise their existing tax laws, regulations and/or procedures in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. Changes in or uncertainties regarding the laws, regulations or procedures of a country could reduce the after-tax profits of the Fund, directly or indirectly, including by reducing the after-tax profits of companies located in such countries in which the Fund invests, or result in unexpected tax liabilities for the Fund. The performance of the Fund may also be negatively affected by fluctuations in a foreign currency’s strength or weakness relative to the U.S. dollar, particularly to the extent the Fund invests a significant percentage of its assets in foreign securities or other assets denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Currency rates in foreign countries may fluctuate significantly over short or long periods of time for a number of reasons, including changes in interest rates, imposition of currency exchange controls and economic or political developments in the U.S. or abroad. The Fund may also incur currency conversion costs when converting foreign currencies into U.S. dollars and vice versa.
High-Yield Investments Risk. Securities and other debt instruments held by the Fund that are rated below investment grade (commonly called “high-yield” or “junk” bonds) and unrated debt instruments of comparable quality tend to be more sensitive to credit risk than higher-rated debt instruments and may experience greater price fluctuations in response to perceived changes in the ability of the issuing entity or obligor to pay interest and principal when due than to changes in interest rates. These investments are generally more likely to experience a default than higher-rated debt instruments. High-yield debt instruments are considered to be predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal. These debt instruments typically pay a premium – a higher interest rate or yield – because of the increased risk of loss, including default. High-yield debt instruments may require a greater degree of judgment to establish a price, may be difficult to sell at the time and price the Fund desires, may carry high transaction costs, and also are generally less liquid than higher-rated debt instruments. The ratings provided by third party rating agencies are based on analyses by these ratings agencies of the credit quality of the debt instruments and may not take into account every risk related to whether interest or principal will be timely repaid. In adverse economic and other circumstances, issuers of lower-rated debt instruments are more likely to have difficulty making principal and interest payments than issuers of higher-rated debt instruments.
Interest Rate Risk. Interest rate risk is the risk of losses attributable to changes in interest rates. In general, if prevailing interest rates rise, the values of debt instruments tend to fall, and if interest rates fall, the values of debt instruments tend to rise. Changes in the value of a debt instrument usually will not affect the amount of income the Fund receives from it but will
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
11

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
generally affect the value of your investment in the Fund. Changes in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of the Fund’s investments in debt instruments. In general, the longer the maturity or duration of a debt instrument, the greater its sensitivity to changes in interest rates. Interest rate declines also may increase prepayments of debt obligations, which, in turn, would increase prepayment risk (the risk that the Fund will have to reinvest the money received in securities that have lower yields). Very low or negative interest rates may impact the Fund’s yield and may increase the risk that, if followed by rising interest rates, the Fund’s performance will be negatively impacted. The Fund is subject to the risk that the income generated by its investments may not keep pace with inflation. Actions by governments and central banking authorities can result in increases or decreases in interest rates. Higher periods of inflation could lead such authorities to raise interest rates. Such actions may negatively affect the value of debt instruments held by the Fund, resulting in a negative impact on the Fund’s performance and NAV. Any interest rate increases could cause the value of the Fund’s investments in debt instruments to decrease. Rising interest rates may prompt redemptions from the Fund, which may force the Fund to sell investments at a time when it is not advantageous to do so, which could result in losses.
Issuer Risk. An issuer in which the Fund invests or to which it has exposure may perform poorly or below expectations, and the value of its securities may therefore decline, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Underperformance of an issuer may be caused by poor management decisions, competitive pressures, breakthroughs in technology, reliance on suppliers, labor problems or shortages, corporate restructurings, fraudulent disclosures, natural disasters, military confrontations, war, terrorism, disease/virus outbreaks, epidemics or other events, conditions and factors which may impair the value of an investment in the Fund.
Small- and Mid-Cap Stock Risk. Securities of small- and mid-cap companies can, in certain circumstances, have a higher potential for gains than securities of larger companies but are more likely to have more risk than larger companies. For example, small- and mid-cap companies may be more vulnerable to market downturns and adverse business or economic events than larger companies because they may have more limited financial resources and business operations. Small- and mid-cap companies are also more likely than larger companies to have more limited product lines and operating histories and to depend on smaller and generally less experienced management teams. Securities of small- and mid-cap companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes and may be less liquid and fluctuate more sharply in value than securities of larger companies. When the Fund takes significant positions in small- and mid-cap companies with limited trading volumes, the liquidation of those positions, particularly in a distressed market, could be prolonged and result in Fund investment losses that would affect the value of your investment in the Fund. In addition, some small- and mid-cap companies may not be widely followed by the investment community, which can lower the demand for their stocks.
Large-Cap Stock Risk. Investments in larger, more established companies (larger companies) may involve certain risks associated with their larger size. For instance, larger companies may be less able to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in consumer tastes or innovation from smaller competitors. Also, larger companies are sometimes less able to achieve as high growth rates as successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.
Leverage Risk. Leverage occurs when the Fund increases its assets available for investment using borrowing, derivatives, or similar instruments or techniques. Use of leverage can produce volatility and may exaggerate changes in the NAV of Fund shares and in the return on the Fund’s portfolio, which may increase the risk that the Fund will lose more than it has invested. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so to satisfy its obligations or to meet any required asset segregation or position coverage requirements. Futures contracts, options, forward contracts and other derivatives can allow the Fund to obtain large investment exposures in return for meeting relatively small margin requirements. As a result, investments in those transactions may be highly leveraged. If the Fund uses leverage, through the purchase of particular instruments such as derivatives, the Fund may experience capital losses that exceed the net assets of the Fund. Leverage can create an interest expense that may lower the Fund’s overall returns.  Leverage presents the opportunity for increased net income and capital gains, but may also exaggerate the Fund’s volatility and risk of loss. There can be no guarantee that a leveraging strategy will be successful.
12 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
Market Risk. The Fund may incur losses due to declines in the value of one or more securities in which it invests. These declines may be due to factors affecting a particular issuer, or the result of, among other things, political, regulatory, market, economic or social developments affecting the relevant market(s) more generally. In addition, turbulence in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers, which could adversely affect the Fund, including causing difficulty in assigning prices to hard-to-value assets in thinly traded and closed markets, significant redemptions and operational challenges. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. As a result, local, regional or global events such as terrorism, war, natural disasters, disease/virus outbreaks and epidemics or other public health issues, recessions, depressions or other events –  or the potential for such events –  could have a significant negative impact on global economic and market conditions. 
The coronavirus disease 2019 and its variants (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in, and may continue to result in, significant global economic and societal disruption and market volatility due to disruptions in market access, resource availability, facilities operations, imposition of tariffs, export controls and supply chain disruption, among others. Such disruptions may be caused, or exacerbated by, quarantines and travel restrictions, workforce displacement and loss in human and other resources. The uncertainty surrounding the magnitude, duration, reach, costs and effects of the global pandemic, as well as actions that have been or could be taken by governmental authorities or other third parties, present unknowns that are yet to unfold. The impacts, as well as the uncertainty over impacts to come, of COVID-19 – and any other infectious illness outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics that may arise in the future – could negatively affect global economies and markets in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. In addition, the impact of infectious illness outbreaks and epidemics in emerging market countries may be greater due to generally less established healthcare systems, governments and financial markets. Public health crises caused by the COVID-19 outbreak may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks in certain countries or globally. The disruptions caused by COVID-19 could prevent the Fund from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner and negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Any such events could have a significant adverse impact on the value and risk profile of the Fund.
Non-Diversified Fund Risk. The Fund is non-diversified, which generally means that it will invest a greater percentage of its total assets in the securities of fewer issuers than a “diversified” fund. This increases the risk that a change in the value of any one investment held by the Fund could affect the overall value of the Fund more than it would affect that of a diversified fund holding a greater number of investments. Accordingly, the Fund’s value will likely be more volatile than the value of a more diversified fund.
Rule 144A and Other Exempted Securities Risk. The Fund may invest in privately placed and other securities or instruments exempt from SEC registration (collectively “private placements”). In the U.S. market, private placements are typically sold only to qualified institutional buyers, or qualified purchasers, as applicable. An insufficient number of buyers interested in purchasing private placements at a particular time could adversely affect the marketability of such investments and the Fund might be unable to dispose of them promptly or at reasonable prices, subjecting the Fund to liquidity risk (the risk that it may not be possible for the Fund to liquidate the instrument at an advantageous time or price). The Fund may invest in private placements determined to be liquid as well as those determined to be illiquid. Even if determined to be liquid, the Fund’s holdings of private placements may increase the level of Fund illiquidity if eligible buyers are unable or unwilling to purchase them at a particular time. The Fund may also have to bear the expense of registering the securities for resale and the risk of substantial delays in effecting the registration. Additionally, the purchase price and subsequent valuation of private placements typically reflect a discount, which may be significant, from the market price of comparable securities for which a more liquid market exists. Issuers of Rule 144A eligible securities are required to furnish information to potential investors upon request. However, the required disclosure is much less extensive than that required of public companies and is not publicly available since the offering information is not filed with the SEC. Further, issuers of Rule 144A eligible securities can require recipients of the offering information (such as the Fund) to agree contractually to keep the information confidential, which could also adversely affect the Fund’s ability to dispose of the security.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
13

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
Sector Risk. At times, the Fund may have a significant portion of its assets invested in securities of companies conducting business within one or more economic sectors, including the information technology sector. Companies in the same sector may be similarly affected by economic, regulatory, political or market events or conditions, which may make the Fund more vulnerable to unfavorable developments in that sector than funds that invest more broadly. Generally, the more broadly the Fund invests, the more it spreads risk and potentially reduces the risks of loss and volatility.
Information Technology Sector. The Fund is more susceptible to the particular risks that may affect companies in the information technology sector than if it were invested in a wider variety of companies in unrelated sectors. Companies in the information technology sector are subject to certain risks, including the risk that new services, equipment or technologies will not be accepted by consumers and businesses or will become rapidly obsolete. Performance of such companies may be affected by factors including obtaining and protecting patents (or the failure to do so) and significant competitive pressures, including aggressive pricing of their products or services, new market entrants, competition for market share and short product cycles due to an accelerated rate of technological developments. Such competitive pressures may lead to limited earnings and/or falling profit margins. As a result, the value of their securities may fall or fail to rise. In addition, many information technology sector companies have limited operating histories and prices of these companies’ securities historically have been more volatile than other securities, especially over the short term. Some companies in the information technology sector are facing increased government and regulatory scrutiny and may be subject to adverse government or regulatory action, which could negatively impact the value of their securities.
Semiconductors and Semiconductor Equipment Industry Risk. The Fund has a significant portion of its assets invested in securities of companies conducting business within the semiconductors and semiconductor equipment industry, which is included within the Information Technology sector. Companies in the same or related industries may be similarly affected by economic, regulatory, political or market events or conditions, which may make the Fund more vulnerable to unfavorable developments than funds that invest more broadly. Generally, the more broadly a fund invests, the more it spreads risk and potentially reduces the risks of loss and volatility.
The Fund is sensitive to, and its performance may depend to a greater extent on, the overall condition of the semiconductor and semiconductor equipment industry. The risks of investments in this industry include: intense competition, both domestically and internationally, including competition from subsidized foreign competitors with lower production costs; wide fluctuations in securities prices due to risks of rapid obsolescence of products and related technology; economic performance of the customers of semiconductor and related companies; their research costs and the risks that their products may not prove commercially successful; and thin capitalization and limited product lines, markets, financial resources or quality management and personnel. Semiconductor design and process methodologies are subject to rapid technological change requiring large expenditures, potentially requiring financing that may be difficult or impossible to obtain, for research and development in order to improve product performance and increase manufacturing yields. These companies rely on a combination of patents, trade secret laws and contractual provisions to protect their technologies. The process of seeking patent protection can be long and expensive. The industry is characterized by frequent litigation regarding patent and other intellectual property rights, which may require such companies to defend against competitors’ assertions of intellectual property infringement or misappropriation. Some companies are also engaged in other lines of business unrelated to the semiconductor business, and these companies may experience problems with these lines of business that could adversely affect their operating results. The international operations of many companies expose them to the risks associated with instability and changes in economic and political conditions, foreign currency fluctuations, changes in foreign regulations, tariffs, and trade disputes. Business conditions in this industry can change rapidly from periods of strong demand to periods of weak demand. Any future downturn in the industry could harm the business and operating results of these companies. The stock prices of companies in the industry have been and will likely continue to be volatile relative to the overall market.
The industry may also be affected by risks that affect the broader technology sector, including: government regulation, dramatic and often unpredictable changes in growth rates and competition for qualified personnel, a small number of companies representing a large portion of the technology semiconductor industry as a whole, cyclical market patterns, significant product price erosion hampering company profits, periods of over-capacity and production shortages, changing demand, variations in manufacturing costs and yields and significant expenditures for capital equipment and product development.
14 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fund Investment Objective, Strategies, Policies and Principal Risks  (continued)
(Unaudited)
Transactions in Derivatives. The Fund may enter into derivative transactions or otherwise have exposure to derivative transactions through underlying investments. Derivatives are financial contracts whose values are, for example, based on (or “derived” from) traditional securities (such as a stock or bond), assets (such as a commodity like gold or a foreign currency), reference rates (such as the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (commonly known as SOFR) or the London Interbank Offered Rate (commonly known as LIBOR)) or market indices (such as the Standard & Poor’s 500® Index). The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity which involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. Derivatives involve special risks and may result in losses or may limit the Fund’s potential gain from favorable market movements. Derivative strategies often involve leverage, which may exaggerate a loss, potentially causing the Fund to lose more money than it would have lost had it invested in the underlying security or other asset directly. The values of derivatives may move in unexpected ways, especially in unusual market conditions, and may result in increased volatility in the value of the derivative and/or the Fund’s shares, among other consequences. The use of derivatives may also increase the amount of taxes payable by shareholders holding shares in a taxable account. Other risks arise from the Fund’s potential inability to terminate or to sell derivative positions. A liquid secondary market may not always exist for the Fund’s derivative positions at times when the Fund might wish to terminate or to sell such positions. Over-the-counter instruments (investments not traded on an exchange) may be illiquid, and transactions in derivatives traded in the over-the-counter market are subject to the risk that the other party will not meet its obligations. The use of derivatives also involves the risks of mispricing or improper valuation and that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying security, asset, reference rate or index. The Fund also may not be able to find a suitable derivative transaction counterparty, and thus may be unable to engage in derivative transactions when it is deemed favorable to do so, or at all. U.S. federal legislation has been enacted that provides for new clearing, margin, reporting and registration requirements for participants in the derivatives market. These changes could restrict and/or impose significant costs or other burdens upon the Fund’s participation in derivatives transactions. The U.S. government and the European Union (and some other jurisdictions) have enacted regulations and similar requirements that prescribe clearing, margin, reporting and registration requirements for participants in the derivatives market. These requirements are evolving and their ultimate impact on the Fund remains unclear, but such impact could include restricting and/or imposing significant costs or other burdens upon the Fund’s participation in derivatives transactions. Additionally, in October 2020, the SEC adopted new regulations governing the use of derivatives by registered investment companies. Once effective, Rule 18f-4 will, among other things, require funds that invest in derivative instruments beyond a specified limited amount to apply a value-at-risk-based limit to their use of certain derivative instruments and establish a comprehensive derivatives risk management program. A fund that uses derivative instruments in a limited amount will not be subject to the full requirements of Rule 18f-4. Compliance with Rule 18f-4 will not be required until August 2022. Rule 18f-4 could have an adverse impact on the Fund’s performance and ability to implement its investment strategies as it has historically.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
15

Fees and Expenses and Share Price Data
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund’s Common Stock. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
Stockholder Transaction Expenses
Dividend investment plan None(a)
    
Annual Expenses (as a percentage of net asset attributable to common shares)
Management fees(b) 1.06%
Other expenses 0.07%
Acquired fund fees and expenses 0.00%
Total Annual Expenses(c) 1.13%
(a) There are no service or brokerage charges to participants in the dividend investment plan; however, the Fund reserves the right to amend the plan to include a service charge payable to the Fund by the participants. The Fund reserves the right to amend the plan to provide for payment of brokerage fees by the plan participants in the event the plan is changed to provide for open market purchases of Fund Common Stock on behalf of plan participants.
(b) The Fund’s management fee is 1.06% of the Fund’s average daily Managed Assets (which means the net asset value of Fund’s outstanding common stock plus the liquidation preference of any issued and outstanding preferred stock of the Fund and the principal amount of any borrowing used for leverage). The management fee rate noted in the table reflects the rate paid by Common Stockholders as a percentage of the Fund’s net assets attributable to Common Stock.
(c) “Total Annual Expenses" include acquired fund fees and expenses (expenses the Fund incurs indirectly through its investments in other investment companies) and may be higher than “Total gross expenses” shown in the Financial Highlights section of this report because “Total gross expenses” does not include acquired fund fees and expenses.
Example
The following example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. The example illustrates the hypothetical expenses that you would incur over the time periods indicated, and assumes that:
you invest $1,000 in the Fund for the periods indicated,
your investment has a 5% return each year, and
the Fund’s total annual operating expenses remain the same as shown in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses table above.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on the assumptions listed above, your costs would be:
  1 year 3 years 5 years 10 years
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. Common Stock $115 $359 $622 $1,375
The purpose of the tables above is to assist you in understanding the various costs and expenses you will bear directly or indirectly.
Share Price Data
The Fund’s Common Stock is traded primarily on the New York Stock Exchange (the Exchange). The following table shows the high and low closing prices of the Fund’s Common Stock on the Exchange for each calendar quarter since the beginning of 2020, as well as the net asset values and the range of the percentage (discounts)/premiums to net asset value per share that correspond to such prices.
16 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Fees and Expenses and Share Price Data  (continued)
  Market Price ($) Corresponding NAV ($) Corresponding (Discount)/Premium to NAV (%)
  High Low High Low High Low
2020            
1st Quarter 25.25 14.44 24.69 15.42 2.27 (6.36)
2nd Quarter 23.37 16.18 21.01 17.28 11.23 (6.37)
3rd Quarter 23.33 21.09 22.31 21.35 4.57 (1.22)
4th Quarter 27.63 21.33 27.41 21.91 0.80 (2.65)
2021            
1st Quarter 31.45 26.67 31.75 28.10 (0.94) (5.09)
2nd Quarter 35.94 31.05 33.83 29.82 6.24 4.12
3rd Quarter 35.33 32.60 33.69 32.17 4.87 1.34
4th Quarter 39.07 32.10 35.81 31.86 9.10 0.75
The Fund’s Common Stock has historically fluctuated between trading on the market at a discount to net asset value and at a premium to net asset value. The closing market price, net asset value and percentage (discount)/premium to net asset value per share of the Fund’s Common Stock on December 31, 2021 were $37.01, $35.42, and 4.49%, respectively.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
17

Portfolio of Investments
December 31, 2021
(Percentages represent value of investments compared to net assets)
Investments in securities
Common Stocks 102.1%
Issuer Shares Value ($)
Communication Services 9.6%
Broadcasting 1.8%
Discovery, Inc., Class C(a) 147,632 3,380,773
Fox Corp., Class A 183,200 6,760,080
Total Broadcasting 10,140,853
Cable & Satellite 0.4%
Comcast Corp., Class A 48,825 2,457,362
Total Cable & Satellite 2,457,362
Interactive Home Entertainment 0.9%
Activision Blizzard, Inc. 74,682 4,968,593
Total Interactive Home Entertainment 4,968,593
Interactive Media & Services 6.4%
Alphabet, Inc., Class A(a) 7,341 21,267,171
Alphabet, Inc., Class C(a) 4,785 13,845,828
Twitter, Inc.(a) 22,500 972,450
Total Interactive Media & Services 36,085,449
Wireless Telecommunication Services 0.1%
T-Mobile USA, Inc.(a) 3,500 405,930
Total Wireless Telecommunication Services 405,930
Total Communication Services 54,058,187
Consumer Discretionary 2.4%
Education Services 0.1%
Udemy, Inc.(a) 19,061 372,452
Total Education Services 372,452
Internet & Direct Marketing Retail 2.3%
eBay, Inc. 195,829 13,022,628
Total Internet & Direct Marketing Retail 13,022,628
Total Consumer Discretionary 13,395,080
Health Care 0.1%
Biotechnology 0.1%
Eiger BioPharmaceuticals, Inc.(a) 112,861 585,749
Total Biotechnology 585,749
Total Health Care 585,749
Industrials 2.1%
Heavy Electrical Equipment 1.9%
Bloom Energy Corp., Class A(a) 484,201 10,618,528
Total Heavy Electrical Equipment 10,618,528
Common Stocks (continued)
Issuer Shares Value ($)
Human Resource & Employment Services 0.2%
HireRight Holdings Corp.(a) 76,595 1,225,520
Total Human Resource & Employment Services 1,225,520
Total Industrials 11,844,048
Information Technology 87.9%
Application Software 9.2%
Cerence, Inc.(a) 70,392 5,394,843
Cognyte Software Ltd.(a) 31,024 486,146
Dropbox, Inc., Class A(a) 443,135 10,874,533
Enfusion, Inc., Class A(a) 29,471 617,123
Intapp, Inc.(a) 20,763 522,397
Salesforce.com, Inc.(a) 19,200 4,879,296
Samsara, Inc., Class A(a) 182,826 5,139,239
Splunk, Inc.(a) 7,100 821,612
Synopsys, Inc.(a) 53,902 19,862,887
Verint Systems, Inc.(a) 25,368 1,332,073
Zendesk, Inc.(a) 20,100 2,096,229
Total Application Software 52,026,378
Communications Equipment 6.2%
Arista Networks, Inc.(a) 26,644 3,830,075
Cisco Systems, Inc. 54,500 3,453,665
F5, Inc.(a) 37,800 9,250,038
Lumentum Holdings, Inc.(a) 78,650 8,318,811
Plantronics, Inc.(a) 213,242 6,256,520
Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson, ADR 352,600 3,832,762
Total Communications Equipment 34,941,871
Data Processing & Outsourced Services 4.1%
Fidelity National Information Services, Inc. 39,300 4,289,595
Fiserv, Inc.(a) 47,476 4,927,534
Pagseguro Digital Ltd., Class A(a) 63,241 1,658,179
Visa, Inc., Class A 57,625 12,487,914
Total Data Processing & Outsourced Services 23,363,222
Electronic Equipment & Instruments 1.4%
Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. 86,025 7,833,437
Total Electronic Equipment & Instruments 7,833,437
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
18 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Portfolio of Investments  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Common Stocks (continued)
Issuer Shares Value ($)
Internet Services & Infrastructure 1.6%
GoDaddy, Inc., Class A(a) 107,785 9,146,635
Total Internet Services & Infrastructure 9,146,635
IT Consulting & Other Services 0.8%
DXC Technology Co.(a) 66,600 2,143,854
Thoughtworks Holding, Inc.(a) 93,803 2,514,858
Total IT Consulting & Other Services 4,658,712
Semiconductor Equipment 15.4%
Applied Materials, Inc. 131,586 20,706,373
Lam Research Corp.(b) 55,172 39,676,944
Teradyne, Inc.(b) 162,707 26,607,476
Total Semiconductor Equipment 86,990,793
Semiconductors 24.0%
Analog Devices, Inc. 76,494 13,445,350
Broadcom, Inc.(b) 32,325 21,509,378
GlobalFoundries, Inc.(a) 77,115 5,010,162
Intel Corp. 81,416 4,192,924
Marvell Technology, Inc. 187,522 16,406,300
Microchip Technology, Inc. 63,800 5,554,428
Micron Technology, Inc. 143,560 13,372,614
NXP Semiconductors NV 33,800 7,698,964
Qorvo, Inc.(a) 54,875 8,581,901
Rambus, Inc.(a) 107,100 3,147,669
Renesas Electronics Corp.(a) 433,200 5,380,649
SMART Global Holdings, Inc.(a) 63,945 4,539,456
Synaptics, Inc.(a) 92,345 26,734,801
Total Semiconductors 135,574,596
Systems Software 12.6%
Fortinet, Inc.(a) 29,844 10,725,934
McAfee Corp., Class A 47,675 1,229,538
Microsoft Corp. 60,200 20,246,464
NortonLifeLock, Inc. 363,848 9,452,771
Common Stocks (continued)
Issuer Shares Value ($)
Oracle Corp. 56,100 4,892,481
Palo Alto Networks, Inc.(a) 19,061 10,612,402
SailPoint Technologies Holdings, Inc.(a) 36,319 1,755,661
Tenable Holdings, Inc.(a) 29,200 1,608,044
VMware, Inc., Class A 33,573 3,890,439
Xperi Holding Corp. 345,888 6,540,742
Total Systems Software 70,954,476
Technology Hardware, Storage & Peripherals 12.6%
Apple, Inc.(b) 172,000 30,542,040
Dell Technologies, Inc.(a) 89,479 5,026,036
HP, Inc. 272,757 10,274,756
NetApp, Inc. 110,659 10,179,521
Western Digital Corp.(a) 226,949 14,799,344
Total Technology Hardware, Storage & Peripherals 70,821,697
Total Information Technology 496,311,817
Total Common Stocks
(Cost: $254,517,700)
576,194,881
Money Market Funds 2.2%
  Shares Value ($)
Columbia Short-Term Cash Fund, 0.085%(c),(d) 12,270,595 12,268,140
Total Money Market Funds
(Cost: $12,268,648)
12,268,140
Total Investments in Securities
(Cost $266,786,348)
588,463,021
Other Assets & Liabilities, Net   (24,242,941)
Net Assets $564,220,080
 
At December 31, 2021, securities and/or cash totaling $92,152,850 were pledged as collateral.
Investments in derivatives
Call option contracts written
Description Counterparty Trading
currency
Notional
amount
Number of
contracts
Exercise
price/Rate
Expiration
date
Premium
received ($)
Value ($)
NASDAQ 100 Index Morgan Stanley USD (288,865,416) (177) 16,450.00 1/21/2022 (1,958,646) (3,473,625)
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
19

Portfolio of Investments  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Notes to Portfolio of Investments
(a) Non-income producing investment.
(b) This security or a portion of this security has been pledged as collateral in connection with derivative contracts.
(c) The rate shown is the seven-day current annualized yield at December 31, 2021.
(d) As defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, an affiliated company is one in which the Fund owns 5% or more of the company’s outstanding voting securities, or a company which is under common ownership or control with the Fund. The value of the holdings and transactions in these affiliated companies during the year ended December 31, 2021 are as follows:
    
Affiliated issuers Beginning
of period($)
Purchases($) Sales($) Net change in
unrealized
appreciation
(depreciation)($)
End of
period($)
Realized gain
(loss)($)
Dividends($) End of
period shares
Columbia Short-Term Cash Fund, 0.085%
  9,894,909 103,477,001 (101,103,262) (508) 12,268,140 (659) 5,626 12,270,595
Abbreviation Legend
ADR American Depositary Receipt
Currency Legend
USD US Dollar
Fair value measurements
The Fund categorizes its fair value measurements according to a three-level hierarchy that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by prioritizing that the most observable input be used when available. Observable inputs are those that market participants would use in pricing an investment based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity. Unobservable inputs are those that reflect the Fund’s assumptions about the information market participants would use in pricing an investment. An investment’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is deemed significant to the asset’s or liability’s fair value measurement. The input levels are not necessarily an indication of the risk or liquidity associated with investments at that level. For example, certain U.S. government securities are generally high quality and liquid, however, they are reflected as Level 2 because the inputs used to determine fair value may not always be quoted prices in an active market.
Fair value inputs are summarized in the three broad levels listed below:
Level 1 — Valuations based on quoted prices for investments in active markets that the Fund has the ability to access at the measurement date. Valuation adjustments are not applied to Level 1 investments.
Level 2 — Valuations based on other significant observable inputs (including quoted prices for similar securities, interest rates, prepayment speeds, credit risks, etc.).
Level 3 — Valuations based on significant unobservable inputs (including the Fund’s own assumptions and judgment in determining the fair value of investments).
Inputs that are used in determining fair value of an investment may include price information, credit data, volatility statistics, and other factors. These inputs can be either observable or unobservable. The availability of observable inputs can vary between investments, and is affected by various factors such as the type of investment, and the volume and level of activity for that investment or similar investments in the marketplace. The inputs will be considered by the Investment Manager, along with any other relevant factors in the calculation of an investment’s fair value. The Fund uses prices and inputs that are current as of the measurement date, which may include periods of market dislocations. During these periods, the availability of prices and inputs may be reduced for many investments. This condition could cause an investment to be reclassified between the various levels within the hierarchy.
Foreign equity securities actively traded in markets where there is a significant delay in the local close relative to the New York Stock Exchange are classified as Level 2. The values of these securities may include an adjustment to reflect the impact of market movements following the close of local trading, as described in Note 2 to the financial statements – Security valuation.
Investments falling into the Level 3 category are primarily supported by quoted prices from brokers and dealers participating in the market for those investments. However, these may be classified as Level 3 investments due to lack of market transparency and corroboration to support these quoted prices. Additionally, valuation models may be used as the pricing source for any remaining investments classified as Level 3. These models may rely on one or more significant unobservable inputs and/or significant assumptions by the Investment Manager. Inputs used in valuations may include, but are not limited to, financial statement analysis, capital account balances, discount rates and estimated cash flows, and comparable company data.
Under the direction of the Fund’s Board of Directors (the Board), the Investment Manager’s Valuation Committee (the Committee) is responsible for overseeing the valuation procedures approved by the Board. The Committee consists of voting and non-voting members from various groups within the Investment Manager’s organization, including operations and accounting, trading and investments, compliance, risk management and legal.
The Committee meets at least monthly to review and approve valuation matters, which may include a description of specific valuation determinations, data regarding pricing information received from approved pricing vendors and brokers and the results of Board-approved valuation control policies and procedures (the Policies). The Policies address, among other things, instances when market quotations are or are not readily available, including recommendations of third party pricing vendors and a determination of appropriate pricing methodologies; events that require specific valuation determinations and assessment of fair value techniques; securities with a potential for stale pricing, including those that are illiquid, restricted, or in default; and the effectiveness of third party pricing vendors, including periodic reviews of vendors. The Committee meets more frequently, as needed, to discuss additional valuation matters, which may include the need to review back-testing results, review time-sensitive information or approve related valuation actions. The Committee reports to the Board, with members of the Committee meeting with the Board at each of its regularly scheduled meetings to discuss valuation matters and actions during the period, similar to those described earlier.
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
20 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Portfolio of Investments  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Fair value measurements  (continued)
The following table is a summary of the inputs used to value the Fund’s investments at December 31, 2021:
  Level 1 ($) Level 2 ($) Level 3 ($) Total ($)
Investments in Securities        
Common Stocks        
Communication Services 54,058,187 54,058,187
Consumer Discretionary 13,395,080 13,395,080
Health Care 585,749 585,749
Industrials 11,844,048 11,844,048
Information Technology 490,931,168 5,380,649 496,311,817
Total Common Stocks 570,814,232 5,380,649 576,194,881
Money Market Funds 12,268,140 12,268,140
Total Investments in Securities 583,082,372 5,380,649 588,463,021
Investments in Derivatives        
Liability        
Options Contracts Written (3,473,625) (3,473,625)
Total 579,608,747 5,380,649 584,989,396
See the Portfolio of Investments for all investment classifications not indicated in the table.
The Fund’s assets assigned to the Level 2 input category are generally valued using the market approach, in which a security’s value is determined through reference to prices and information from market transactions for similar or identical assets. These assets include certain foreign securities for which a third party statistical pricing service may be employed for purposes of fair market valuation. The model utilized by such third party statistical pricing service takes into account a security’s correlation to available market data including, but not limited to, intraday index, ADR, and exchange-traded fund movements.
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
21

Statement of Assets and Liabilities
December 31, 2021
Assets  
Investments in securities, at value  
Unaffiliated issuers (cost $254,517,700) $576,194,881
Affiliated issuers (cost $12,268,648) 12,268,140
Cash 102,500
Receivable for:  
Investments sold 359,141
Dividends 182,669
Foreign tax reclaims 13,301
Prepaid expenses 38,816
Total assets 589,159,448
Liabilities  
Option contracts written, at value (premiums received $1,958,646) 3,473,625
Payable for:  
Investments purchased 755,526
Distributions to shareholders 20,499,735
Management services fees 16,403
Stockholder servicing and transfer agent fees 528
Compensation of board members 148,413
Stockholders’ meeting fees 1,183
Compensation of chief compliance officer 98
Other expenses 43,857
Total liabilities 24,939,368
Net assets applicable to outstanding Common Stock $564,220,080
Represented by  
Paid in capital 218,876,827
Total distributable earnings (loss) 345,343,253
Total - representing net assets applicable to outstanding Common Stock $564,220,080
Shares outstanding applicable to Common Stock 15,929,548
Net asset value per share of outstanding Common Stock $35.42
Market price per share of Common Stock $37.01
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
22 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Statement of Operations
Year Ended December 31, 2021
Net investment income  
Income:  
Dividends — unaffiliated issuers $4,949,593
Dividends — affiliated issuers 5,626
Foreign taxes withheld (23,339)
Total income 4,931,880
Expenses:  
Management services fees 5,496,087
Stockholder servicing and transfer agent fees 17,376
Compensation of board members 55,524
Custodian fees 18,681
Printing and postage fees 63,778
Stockholders’ meeting fees 40,393
Audit fees 50,280
Legal fees 5,727
Compensation of chief compliance officer 105
Other 114,091
Total expenses 5,862,042
Net investment loss (930,162)
Realized and unrealized gain (loss) — net  
Net realized gain (loss) on:  
Investments — unaffiliated issuers 71,903,687
Investments — affiliated issuers (659)
Foreign currency translations (1,055)
Options purchased 131,960
Options contracts written 2,241,928
Net realized gain 74,275,861
Net change in unrealized appreciation (depreciation) on:  
Investments — unaffiliated issuers 98,720,322
Investments — affiliated issuers (508)
Foreign currency translations (548)
Options purchased (9,434)
Options contracts written (1,757,650)
Net change in unrealized appreciation (depreciation) 96,952,182
Net realized and unrealized gain 171,228,043
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations $170,297,881
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
23

Statement of Changes in Net Assets
  Year Ended
December 31, 2021
Year Ended
December 31, 2020
Operations    
Net investment income (loss) $(930,162) $1,736,081
Net realized gain 74,275,861 23,224,709
Net change in unrealized appreciation (depreciation) 96,952,182 74,868,847
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations 170,297,881 99,829,637
Distributions to stockholders    
Net investment income and net realized gains (49,943,197) (29,394,307)
Total distributions to stockholders (49,943,197) (29,394,307)
Increase in net assets from capital stock activity 751,802 615,471
Total increase in net assets 121,106,486 71,050,801
Net assets at beginning of year 443,113,594 372,062,793
Net assets at end of year $564,220,080 $443,113,594
    
  Year Ended Year Ended
  December 31, 2021 December 31, 2020
  Shares Dollars ($) Shares Dollars ($)
Capital stock activity
Common Stock issued at market price in distributions 22,951 751,802 30,215 669,829
Common Stock purchased in the open market (2,629) (54,358)
Total net increase 22,951 751,802 27,586 615,471
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
24 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Financial Highlights
The Fund’s financial highlights are presented below. Per share operating performance data is designed to allow investors to trace the operating performance, on a per Common Stock share basis, from the beginning net asset value to the ending net asset value, so that investors can understand what effect the individual items have on their investment, assuming it was held throughout the period. Generally, the per share amounts are derived by converting the actual dollar amounts incurred for each item, as disclosed in the financial statements, to their equivalent per Common Stock share amounts, using average Common Stock shares outstanding during the period.
Total return measures the Fund’s performance assuming that investors purchased Fund shares at market price or net asset value as of the beginning of the period, reinvested all their distributions, and then sold their shares at the closing market price or net asset value on the last day of the period. The computations do not reflect taxes or any sales commissions investors may incur on distributions or on the sale of Fund shares. Total returns and portfolio turnover are not annualized for periods of less than one year. The portfolio turnover rate is calculated without regard to purchase and sales transactions of short-term instruments and certain derivatives, if any. If such transactions were included, a Fund’s portfolio turnover rate may be higher.
  Year ended December 31,
2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
Per share data          
Net asset value, beginning of period $27.86 $23.43 $16.96 $20.83 $17.78
Income from investment operations:          
Net investment income (loss) (0.06) 0.11 (0.02) (0.01) (0.06)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) 10.76 6.17 8.34 (1.36) 5.74
Total from investment operations 10.70 6.28 8.32 (1.37) 5.68
Less distributions to Stockholders from:          
Net investment income (0.11)
Net realized gains (3.14) (1.74) (1.85) (2.50) (2.63)
Total distributions to Stockholders (3.14) (1.85) (1.85) (2.50) (2.63)
Net asset value, end of period $35.42 $27.86 $23.43 $16.96 $20.83
Market price, end of period $37.01 $27.24 $23.55 $16.81 $22.25
Total return          
Based upon net asset value 39.38% 29.17% 51.04% (7.77%) 32.72%
Based upon market price 48.96% 25.65% 53.17% (14.42%) 34.51%
Ratios to average net assets          
Total gross expenses(a) 1.13% 1.15% 1.15% 1.15% 1.16%
Net investment income (loss) (0.18%) 0.50% (0.08%) (0.05%) (0.28%)
Supplemental data          
Net assets, end of period (in thousands) $564,220 $443,114 $372,063 $265,315 $320,472
Portfolio turnover 27% 32% 43% 34% 47%
    
Notes to Financial Highlights
(a) In addition to the fees and expenses that the Fund bears directly, the Fund indirectly bears a pro rata share of the fees and expenses of any other funds in which it invests. Such indirect expenses are not included in the Fund’s reported expense ratios.
The accompanying Notes to Financial Statements are an integral part of this statement.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
25

Notes to Financial Statements
December 31, 2021
Note 1. Organization
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. (the Fund) is a non-diversified fund. The Fund is registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the 1940 Act), as a closed-end management investment company.
The Fund was incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland on September 3, 2009, and commenced investment operations on November 30, 2009. The Fund had no investment operations prior to November 30, 2009 other than those relating to organizational matters and the sale to Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (the Investment Manager), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (Ameriprise Financial), of 5,250 shares of Common Stock at a cost of $100,275 on October 14, 2009. As of December 31, 2009, the Fund issued 14,300,000 shares of Common Stock, including 13,100,000 shares of Common Stock in its initial public offering and 1,200,000 shares of Common Stock purchased by the Fund’s underwriters pursuant to an over-allotment option granted to the underwriters in connection with the initial public offering. On January 13, 2010, the Fund’s underwriters purchased an additional 545,000 shares of Common Stock pursuant to the over-allotment option, resulting in a total of 14,845,000 shares of Common Stock issued by the Fund in its initial public offering, including shares purchased by the underwriters pursuant to the over-allotment option. With the closing of this additional purchase of Common Stock, the Fund’s total raise-up in its initial public offering was an aggregate of $296.9 million. The Fund has one billion authorized shares of Common Stock. The issued and outstanding Common Stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “STK”.
The Fund currently has outstanding Common Stock. Each outstanding share of Common Stock entitles the holder thereof to one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of the Common Stockholders, including the election of directors. Because the Fund has no other classes or series of stock outstanding, Common Stock possesses exclusive voting power. All of the Fund’s shares of Common Stock have equal dividend, liquidation, voting and other rights. The Fund’s Common Stockholders have no preference, conversion, redemption, exchange, sinking fund, or appraisal rights and have no preemptive rights to subscribe for any of the Fund’s securities.
Although the Fund has no current intention to do so, the Fund is authorized and reserves the flexibility to use leverage to increase its investments or for other management activities through the issuance of Preferred Stock and/or borrowings. The costs of issuing Preferred Stock and/or a borrowing program would be borne by Common Stockholders and consequently would result in a reduction of net asset value of Common Stock.
Note 2. Summary of significant accounting policies
Basis of preparation
The Fund is an investment company that applies the accounting and reporting guidance in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Topic 946, Financial Services - Investment Companies (ASC 946). The financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), which requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
The following is a summary of significant accounting policies followed by the Fund in the preparation of its financial statements.
Security valuation
Equity securities listed on an exchange are valued at the closing price or last trade price on their primary exchange at the close of business of the New York Stock Exchange. Securities with a closing price not readily available or not listed on any exchange are valued at the mean between the closing bid and ask prices. Listed preferred stocks convertible into common stocks are valued using an evaluated price from a pricing service.
Foreign equity securities are valued based on the closing price or last trade price on their primary exchange at the close of business of the New York Stock Exchange. If any foreign equity security closing prices are not readily available, the securities are valued at the mean of the latest quoted bid and ask prices on such exchanges or markets. Foreign currency exchange rates are determined at the scheduled closing time of the New York Stock Exchange. Many securities markets and
26 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
exchanges outside the U.S. close prior to the close of the New York Stock Exchange; therefore, the closing prices for securities in such markets or on such exchanges may not fully reflect events that occur after such close but before the close of the New York Stock Exchange. In those situations, foreign securities will be fair valued pursuant to a policy adopted by the Board of Directors. Under the policy, the Fund may utilize a third-party pricing service to determine these fair values. The third-party pricing service takes into account multiple factors, including, but not limited to, movements in the U.S. securities markets, certain depositary receipts, futures contracts and foreign exchange rates that have occurred subsequent to the close of the foreign exchange or market, to determine a good faith estimate that reasonably reflects the current market conditions as of the close of the New York Stock Exchange. The fair value of a security is likely to be different from the quoted or published price, if available.
Investments in open-end investment companies (other than exchange-traded funds (ETFs)), are valued at the latest net asset value reported by those companies as of the valuation time.
Option contracts are valued at the mean of the latest quoted bid and ask prices on their primary exchanges. Option contracts, including over-the-counter option contracts, with no readily available market quotations are valued using mid-market evaluations from independent third-party vendors.
Investments for which market quotations are not readily available, or that have quotations which management believes are not reflective of market value or reliable, are valued at fair value as determined in good faith under procedures approved by and under the general supervision of the Board of Directors. If a security or class of securities (such as foreign securities) is valued at fair value, such value is likely to be different from the quoted or published price for the security, if available.
The determination of fair value often requires significant judgment. To determine fair value, management may use assumptions including but not limited to future cash flows and estimated risk premiums. Multiple inputs from various sources may be used to determine fair value.
GAAP requires disclosure regarding the inputs and valuation techniques used to measure fair value and any changes in valuation inputs or techniques. In addition, investments shall be disclosed by major category. This information is disclosed following the Fund’s Portfolio of Investments.
Foreign currency transactions and translations
The values of all assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are generally translated into U.S. dollars at exchange rates determined at the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Net realized and unrealized gains (losses) on foreign currency transactions and translations include gains (losses) arising from the fluctuation in exchange rates between trade and settlement dates on securities transactions, gains (losses) arising from the disposition of foreign currency and currency gains (losses) between the accrual and payment dates on dividends, interest income and foreign withholding taxes.
For financial statement purposes, the Fund does not distinguish that portion of gains (losses) on investments which is due to changes in foreign exchange rates from that which is due to changes in market prices of the investments. Such fluctuations are included with the net realized and unrealized gains (losses) on investments in the Statement of Operations.
Derivative instruments
The Fund may invest in certain derivative instruments, which are transactions whose values depend on or are derived from (in whole or in part) the value of one or more other assets, such as securities, currencies, commodities or indices. The Fund uses a rules-based call option writing strategy on the NASDAQ 100 Index®, an unmanaged index that includes the largest and most active nonfinancial domestic and international companies listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market, or its exchange-traded fund equivalent (NASDAQ 100) on a month-to-month basis.
The Fund may also seek to provide downside protection by purchasing puts on the NASDAQ 100 when premiums on these options are considered by the Investment Manager to be low and, therefore, attractive relative to the downside protection provided.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
27

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
The Fund may also buy or write other call and put options on securities, indices, ETFs and market baskets of securities to generate additional income or return or to provide the portfolio with downside protection. In this regard, options may include writing “in-” or “out-of-the-money” put options or buying or selling options in connection with closing out positions prior to expiration of any options. However, the Fund does not intend to write “naked” call options on individual stocks (i.e., selling a call option on an individual security not owned by the Fund) other than in connection with implementing the options strategies with respect to the NASDAQ 100. The put and call options purchased, sold or written by the Fund may be exchange-listed or over-the-counter.
The notional amounts of derivative instruments, if applicable, are not recorded in the financial statements. A derivative instrument may suffer a mark to market loss if the value of the contract decreases due to an unfavorable change in the market rates or values of the underlying instrument. Losses can also occur if the counterparty does not perform under the contract. Options written by the Fund do not typically give rise to counterparty credit risk, as options written generally obligate the Fund and not the counterparty to perform. With exchange-traded purchased options, there is minimal counterparty credit risk to the Fund since the exchange’s clearinghouse, as counterparty to such instruments, guarantees against a possible default. The clearinghouse stands between the buyer and the seller of the contract; therefore, the counterparty credit risk is limited to failure of the clearinghouse. However, credit risk still exists in exchange traded option contracts with respect to any collateral that is held in a broker’s customer accounts. While clearing brokers are required to segregate customer collateral from their own assets, in the event that a clearing broker becomes insolvent or goes into bankruptcy and at that time there is a shortfall in the aggregate amount of collateral held by the broker for all its clients, U.S. bankruptcy laws will typically allocate that shortfall on a pro-rata basis across all the clearing broker’s customers, potentially resulting in losses to the Fund.
In order to better define its contractual rights and to secure rights that will help the Fund mitigate its counterparty risk, the Fund may enter into an International Swaps and Derivatives Association, Inc. Master Agreement (ISDA Master Agreement) or similar agreement with its derivatives counterparties. An ISDA Master Agreement is a bilateral agreement between a Fund and a counterparty that governs over-the-counter derivatives and foreign exchange forward contracts and contains, among other things, collateral posting terms and netting provisions in the event of a default and/or termination event. Under an ISDA Master Agreement, the Fund may, under certain circumstances, offset with the counterparty certain derivative financial instrument’s payables and/or receivables with collateral held and/or posted and create one single net payment. The provisions of the ISDA Master Agreement typically permit a single net payment in the event of default (close-out netting) including the bankruptcy or insolvency of the counterparty. Note, however, that bankruptcy or insolvency laws of a particular jurisdiction may impose restrictions on or prohibitions against the right of offset in bankruptcy, insolvency or other events. Collateral (margin) requirements differ by type of derivative. Collateral terms for most over-the-counter derivatives are subject to regulatory requirements to exchange variation margin with trading counterparties and may have contract specific margin terms as well. Margin requirements are established by the exchange for exchange traded options. Brokers can ask for margin in excess of the minimum in certain circumstances. To the extent amounts due to the Fund from its counterparties are not fully collateralized, contractually or otherwise, the Fund bears the risk of loss from counterparty nonperformance. The Fund may also pay interest expense on collateral to the broker and/or CCP. Any interest expense paid by the Fund is shown on the Statement of Operations. The Fund attempts to mitigate counterparty risk by only entering into agreements with counterparties that it believes have the financial resources to honor their obligations and by monitoring the financial stability of those counterparties.
Investments in derivative instruments may expose the Fund to certain additional risks, including those detailed below.
Options contracts
Options are contracts which entitle the holder to purchase or sell securities or other identified assets at a specified price, or in the case of index option contracts, to receive or pay the difference between the index value and the strike price of the index option contract. Option contracts can be either exchange-traded or over-the-counter. The Fund purchased and has written option contracts to decrease the Fund’s exposure to equity market risk and to increase return on investments. These instruments may be used for other purposes in future periods. Completion of transactions for option contracts traded in the over-the-counter market depends upon the performance of the other party. Collateral may be collected or posted by the Fund to secure over-the-counter option contract trades. Collateral held or posted by the Fund for such option contract trades must be returned to the broker or the Fund upon closure, exercise or expiration of the contract.
28 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Options contracts purchased are recorded as investments. When the Fund writes an options contract, the premium received is recorded as an asset and an amount equivalent to the premium is recorded as a liability in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities and is subsequently adjusted to reflect the current fair value of the option written. Changes in the fair value of the written option are recorded as unrealized appreciation or depreciation until the contract is exercised or has expired. The Fund realizes a gain or loss when the option contract is closed or expires. When option contracts are exercised, the proceeds on sales for a written call or purchased put option contract, or the purchase cost for a written put or purchased call option contract, is adjusted by the amount of premium received or paid.
For over-the-counter options purchased, the Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount of the premiums paid plus the positive change in market values net of any collateral held by the Fund should the counterparty fail to perform under the contracts. Option contracts written by the Fund do not typically give rise to significant counterparty credit risk, as options written generally obligate the Fund and not the counterparty to perform. The risk in writing a call option contract is that the Fund gives up the opportunity for profit if the market price of the security increases above the strike price and the option contract is exercised. The risk in writing a put option contract is that the Fund may incur a loss if the market price of the security decreases below the strike price and the option contract is exercised. Exercise of a written option could result in the Fund purchasing or selling a security or foreign currency when it otherwise would not, or at a price different from the current market value. In purchasing and writing options, the Fund bears the risk of an unfavorable change in the value of the underlying instrument or the risk that the Fund may not be able to enter into a closing transaction due to an illiquid market.
Effects of derivative transactions in the financial statements
The following tables are intended to provide additional information about the effect of derivatives on the financial statements of the Fund, including: the fair value of derivatives by risk category and the location of those fair values in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities; and the impact of derivative transactions over the period in the Statement of Operations, including realized and unrealized gains (losses). The derivative instrument schedules following the Portfolio of Investments present additional information regarding derivative instruments outstanding at the end of the period, if any.
The following table is a summary of the fair value of derivative instruments (not considered to be hedging instruments for accounting disclosure purposes) at December 31, 2021:
  Liability derivatives  
Risk exposure
category
Statement
of assets and liabilities
location
Fair value ($)
Equity risk Options contracts written, at value 3,473,625
The following table indicates the effect of derivative instruments (not considered to be hedging instruments for accounting disclosure purposes) in the Statement of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2021:
Amount of realized gain (loss) on derivatives recognized in income
Risk exposure category Options
contracts
written
($)
Options
contracts
purchased
($)
Total
($)
Equity risk 2,241,928 131,960 2,373,888
 
Change in unrealized appreciation (depreciation) on derivatives recognized in income
Risk exposure category Options
contracts
written
($)
Options
contracts
purchased
($)
Total
($)
Equity risk (1,757,650) (9,434) (1,767,084)
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
29

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
The following table is a summary of the average outstanding volume by derivative instrument for the year ended December 31, 2021:
Derivative instrument Average
value ($)
Options contracts — purchased 6,219*
Options contracts — written (1,406,855)**
    
* Based on the ending daily outstanding amounts for the year ended December 31, 2021.
** Based on the ending quarterly outstanding amounts for the year ended December 31, 2021.
Offsetting of assets and liabilities
The following table presents the Fund’s gross and net amount of assets and liabilities available for offset under netting arrangements as well as any related collateral received or pledged by the Fund as of December 31, 2021:
  Morgan
Stanley ($)
Liabilities  
Options contracts written 3,473,625
Total financial and derivative net assets (3,473,625)
Total collateral received (pledged) (a) (3,473,625)
Net amount (b) -
    
(a) In some instances, the actual collateral received and/or pledged may be more than the amount shown due to overcollateralization.
(b) Represents the net amount due from/(to) counterparties in the event of default.
Security transactions
Security transactions are accounted for on the trade date. Cost is determined and gains (losses) are based upon the specific identification method for both financial statement and federal income tax purposes.
Income recognition
Corporate actions and dividend income are generally recorded net of any non-reclaimable tax withholdings, on the ex-dividend date or upon receipt of an ex-dividend notification in the case of certain foreign securities.
The Fund may receive distributions from holdings in equity securities, business development companies (BDCs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs), limited partnerships (LPs), other regulated investment companies (RICs), and real estate investment trusts (REITs), which report information as to the tax character of their distributions annually. These distributions are allocated to dividend income, capital gain and return of capital based on actual information reported. Return of capital is recorded as a reduction of the cost basis of securities held. If the Fund no longer owns the applicable securities, return of capital is recorded as a realized gain. With respect to REITs, to the extent actual information has not yet been reported, estimates for return of capital are made by Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (the Investment Manager), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (Ameriprise Financial). The Investment Manager’s estimates are subsequently adjusted when the actual character of the distributions is disclosed by the REITs, which could result in a proportionate change in return of capital to stockholders.
Awards from class action litigation are recorded as a reduction of cost basis if the Fund still owns the applicable securities on the payment date. If the Fund no longer owns the applicable securities on the payment date, the proceeds are recorded as realized gains.
Federal income tax status
The Fund intends to qualify each year as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code, as amended, and will distribute substantially all of its investment company taxable income and net capital gain, if any, for its tax year, and as such will not be subject to federal income taxes. In addition, the Fund intends to distribute in each calendar year substantially all of its ordinary income, capital gain net income and certain other amounts, if any, such that the Fund should not be subject to federal excise tax. Therefore, no federal income or excise tax provision is recorded.
30 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Foreign taxes
The Fund may be subject to foreign taxes on income, gains on investments or currency repatriation, a portion of which may be recoverable. The Fund will accrue such taxes and recoveries, as applicable, based upon its current interpretation of tax rules and regulations that exist in the markets in which it invests.
Realized gains in certain countries may be subject to foreign taxes at the Fund level, based on statutory rates. The Fund accrues for such foreign taxes on realized and unrealized gains at the appropriate rate for each jurisdiction, as applicable. The amount, if any, is disclosed as a liability on the Statement of Assets and Liabilities.
Dividends to stockholders
In November 2010, the Fund paid its first dividend under the Fund’s managed distribution policy adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. Prior to the managed distribution policy, the Fund paid distributions pursuant to a level rate distribution policy. Under its former distribution policy and consistent with the 1940 Act, the Fund could not distribute long-term capital gains, as defined in the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, more often than once in any one taxable year. In October 2010, the Fund received exemptive relief from the Securities and Exchange Commission that permits the Fund to distribute long-term capital gains more often than once in any one taxable year. After consideration by the Fund’s Board of Directors, the Fund adopted the managed distribution policy which allows the Fund to make periodic distributions of long-term capital gains. Under its managed distribution policy, the Fund intends to make quarterly distributions to Common Stockholders at a rate that reflects the past and projected performance of the Fund. The Fund expects to receive all or some of its current income and gains from the following sources: (i) dividends received by the Fund that are paid on the equity and equity-related securities in its portfolio; and (ii) capital gains (short-term and long-term) from option premiums and the sale of portfolio securities. It is possible that the Fund’s distributions will at times exceed the earnings and profits of the Fund and therefore all or a portion of such distributions may constitute a return of capital as described below. A return of capital is a return of a portion of an investor’s original investment. A return of capital is not taxable, but it reduces a Stockholder’s tax basis in his or her shares, thus reducing any loss or increasing any gain on a subsequent taxable disposition by the Stockholder of his or her shares. Distributions may vary, and the Fund’s distribution rate will depend on a number of factors, including the net earnings on the Fund’s portfolio investments and the rate at which such net earnings change as a result of changes in the timing of, and rates at which, the Fund receives income from the sources described above. The net investment income of the Fund consists of all income (other than net short-term and long-term capital gains) less all expenses of the Fund.
The Board of Directors may change the Fund’s distribution policy and the amount or timing of the distributions, based on a number of factors, including, but not limited to, as the Fund’s portfolio and market conditions change, the amount of the Fund’s undistributed net investment income and net short- and long-term capital gains and historical and projected net investment income and net short- and long-term capital gains. Over time, the Fund will distribute all of its net investment income and net short-term capital gains. In addition, at least annually, the Fund intends to distribute any net capital gain (which is the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) or, alternatively, to retain all or a portion of the year’s net capital gain and pay federal income tax on the retained gain.
Dividends and other distributions to stockholders are recorded on ex-dividend dates.
The Fund has an investment objective to seek growth of capital and current income. In the latter regard, in 2021, the Fund’s managed distribution policy provided stockholders with current income through quarterly distributions of $0.4625 per share, comprised of $0.4701 short-term capital gains and $1.3799 long-term capital gains.  The Fund also paid a special fourth quarter distribution, beyond its typical quarterly managed distribution policy, in the amount of $1.2869 per share. No portion of the Fund’s 2021 distributions, including such special distribution, consisted of a return of capital. A return of capital may occur, for example, when some or all of the money that you invested in the Fund is paid back to you. The Fund was fully invested throughout the period, effecting its technology and options investing strategies so as to position the Fund to achieve its capital appreciation investment objective, as evidenced by the Fund’s NAV return of 39.38% in 2021, which outperformed the Fund’s benchmark, the S&P North American Technology Sector Index’s return of 26.40%.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
31

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Guarantees and indemnifications
Under the Fund’s organizational documents and, in some cases, by contract, its officers and directors are indemnified against certain liabilities arising out of the performance of their duties to the Fund. In addition, certain of the Fund’s contracts with its service providers contain general indemnification clauses. The Fund’s maximum exposure under these arrangements is unknown since the amount of any future claims that may be made against the Fund cannot be determined, and the Fund has no historical basis for predicting the likelihood of any such claims.
Note 3. Fees and other transactions with affiliates
Management services fees
The Fund has entered into a Management Agreement with Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (the Investment Manager), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (Ameriprise Financial). Under the Management Agreement, the Investment Manager provides the Fund with investment research and advice, as well as administrative and accounting services. The management services fee is an annual fee that is equal to 1.06% of the Fund’s daily Managed Assets. "Managed Assets" means the net asset value of the Fund’s outstanding Common Stock plus the liquidation preference of any issued and outstanding preferred stock of the Fund and the principal amount of any borrowings used for leverage. To date, the Fund has not issued preferred stock.
Compensation of board members
Members of the Board of Directors who are not officers or employees of the Investment Manager or Ameriprise Financial are compensated for their services to the Fund as disclosed in the Statement of Operations. Under a Deferred Compensation Plan (the Deferred Plan), these members of the Board of Directors may elect to defer payment of up to 100% of their compensation. Deferred amounts are treated as though equivalent dollar amounts had been invested in shares of certain funds managed by the Investment Manager. The Fund’s liability for these amounts is adjusted for market value changes and remains in the Fund until distributed in accordance with the Deferred Plan. All amounts payable under the Deferred Plan constitute a general unsecured obligation of the Fund.
Compensation of Chief Compliance Officer
The Board of Directors has appointed a Chief Compliance Officer for the Fund in accordance with federal securities regulations. As disclosed in the Statement of Operations, a portion of the Chief Compliance Officer’s total compensation is allocated to the Fund, along with other allocations to affiliated registered investment companies managed by the Investment Manager and its affiliates, based on relative net assets.
Note 4. Federal tax information
The timing and character of income and capital gain distributions are determined in accordance with income tax regulations, which may differ from GAAP because of temporary or permanent book to tax differences.
At December 31, 2021, these differences were primarily due to differing treatment for deferral/reversal of wash sale losses, Directors’ deferred compensation, derivative investments, post-October capital losses, distributions, net operating loss reclassification and foreign currency transactions. To the extent these differences were permanent, reclassifications were made among the components of the Fund’s net assets. Temporary differences do not require reclassifications.
The following reclassifications were made:
Excess of distributions
over net investment
income ($)
Accumulated
net realized
gain ($)
Paid in
capital ($)
907,637 (907,637)
Net investment income (loss) and net realized gains (losses), as disclosed in the Statement of Operations, and net assets were not affected by this reclassification.
32 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
The tax character of distributions paid during the years indicated was as follows:
Year Ended December 31, 2021 Year Ended December 31, 2020
Ordinary
income ($)
Long-term
capital gains ($)
Total ($) Ordinary
income ($)
Long-term
capital gains ($)
Total ($)
12,363,181 37,580,016 49,943,197 2,129,850 27,264,457 29,394,307
Short-term capital gain distributions, if any, are considered ordinary income distributions for tax purposes.
At December 31, 2021, the components of distributable earnings on a tax basis were as follows:
Undistributed
ordinary income ($)
Undistributed
long-term
capital gains ($)
Capital loss
carryforwards ($)
Net unrealized
appreciation ($)
26,189,459 320,603,575
At December 31, 2021, the cost of all investments for federal income tax purposes along with the aggregate gross unrealized appreciation and depreciation based on that cost was:
Federal
tax cost ($)
Gross unrealized
appreciation ($)
Gross unrealized
(depreciation) ($)
Net unrealized
appreciation ($)
264,385,821 327,831,337 (7,227,762) 320,603,575
Tax cost of investments and unrealized appreciation/(depreciation) may also include timing differences that do not constitute adjustments to tax basis.
Under current tax rules, regulated investment companies can elect to treat certain late-year ordinary losses incurred and post-October capital losses (capital losses realized after October 31) as arising on the first day of the following taxable year. As of December 31, 2021, the Fund will elect to treat the following late-year ordinary losses and post-October capital losses as arising on January 1, 2022.
Late year
ordinary losses ($)
Post-October
capital losses ($)
1,311,470
Management of the Fund has concluded that there are no significant uncertain tax positions in the Fund that would require recognition in the financial statements. However, management’s conclusion may be subject to review and adjustment at a later date based on factors including, but not limited to, new tax laws, regulations, and administrative interpretations (including relevant court decisions). Generally, the Fund’s federal tax returns for the prior three fiscal years remain subject to examination by the Internal Revenue Service.
Note 5. Portfolio information
The cost of purchases and proceeds from sales of securities, excluding short-term investments and derivatives, if any, aggregated to $136,551,866 and $166,144,450, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2021. The amount of purchase and sale activity impacts the portfolio turnover rate reported in the Financial Highlights.
Note 6. Dividend investment plan and stock repurchase program
The Fund, in connection with its Dividend Investment Plan (the Plan), issues shares of its own Common Stock, as needed, to satisfy the Plan requirements. A total of 22,951 shares were issued to the Plan participants during the year ended December 31, 2021 for proceeds of $751,802, a weighted average premium of 0.13% from the net asset value of those shares.
Pursuant to the Plan, unless a Common Stockholder elects otherwise, all cash dividends, capital gains distributions, and other distributions are automatically reinvested in additional Common Stock. If you hold your shares in street name or other nominee (i.e., through a broker), you should contact them to determine their policy, as the broker firm’s policy with respect to
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
33

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Fund distributions may be to default to a cash payment. Common Stockholders who elect not to participate in the Plan (including those whose intermediaries do not permit participation in the Plan by their customers) will receive all dividends and distributions payable in cash directly to the Common Stockholder of record (or, if the shares of Common Stock are held in street or other nominee name, then to such nominee). Common Stockholders may elect not to participate in the Plan and to receive all distributions of dividends and capital gains or other distributions in cash by sending written instructions to American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC (AST), 59 Maiden Lane Plaza Level, New York, New York 10038. Participation in the Plan may be terminated or resumed at any time without penalty by written notice if received by AST, prior to the record date for the next distribution. Otherwise, such termination or resumption will be effective with respect to any subsequently declared distribution. The income tax consequences of participation in the Plan are the same whether you participate in the Plan and reinvest your Fund distributions or you elect not to participate in the Plan and receive all your Fund distributions in cash (i.e., capital gains and income are realized, although cash is not received by the shareholder).
Under the Plan, Common Stockholders receive shares of Common Stock in lieu of cash distributions unless they have elected otherwise as described above. Common Stock will be issued in lieu of cash by the Fund from previously authorized but unissued Common Stock. If the market price of a share on the ex-dividend date of such a distribution is at or above the Fund’s net asset value per share on such date, the number of shares to be issued by the Fund to each Common Stockholder receiving shares in lieu of cash distributions will be determined by dividing the amount of the cash distribution to which such Common Stockholder would be entitled by the greater of the net asset value per share on such date or 95% of the market price of a share on such date. If the market price of a share on such an ex-dividend date is below the net asset value per share, the number of shares to be issued to such Common Stockholders will be determined by dividing such amount by the per share market price. The issuance of Common Stock at less than net asset value per share will dilute the net asset value of all Common Stock outstanding at that time. Market price on any day means the closing price for the Common Stock at the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange on such day or, if such day is not a day on which the Common Stock trades, the closing price for the Common Stock at the close of regular trading on the immediately preceding day on which trading occurs.
The Fund reserves the right to amend or terminate the Plan as applied to any distribution paid subsequent to written notice of the change sent to participants in the Plan at least 90 days before the record date for such distribution. There are no service or brokerage charges to participants in the Plan; however, the Fund reserves the right to amend the Plan to include a service charge payable to the Fund by the participants. The Fund reserves the right to amend the Plan to provide for payment of brokerage fees by the Plan participants in the event the Plan is changed to provide for open market purchases of Common Stock on behalf of the Plan participants. All correspondence concerning the Plan should be directed to AST.
The Fund, under its stock repurchase program, currently intends to make open market purchases of its Common Stock from time to time when the Fund’s Common Stock is trading at a discount to its net asset value, in an amount approximately sufficient to offset the growth in the number of shares of Common Stock issued as a result of the reinvestment of the portion of its distributions to Common Stockholders that are attributable to distributions received by the Fund from its underlying portfolio investments less fund expenses. No shares were purchased in the open market during the year ended December 31, 2021.
Note 7. Affiliated money market fund
The Fund invests in Columbia Short-Term Cash Fund, an affiliated money market fund established for the exclusive use by the Fund and other affiliated funds (the Affiliated MMF). The income earned by the Fund from such investments is included as Dividends - affiliated issuers in the Statement of Operations. As an investing fund, the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of the expenses of the Affiliated MMF. The Affiliated MMF prices its shares with a floating net asset value. In addition, the Board of Trustees of the Affiliated MMF may impose a fee on redemptions (sometimes referred to as a liquidity fee) or temporarily suspend redemptions (sometimes referred to as imposing a redemption gate) in the event its liquidity falls below regulatory limits.
34 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Note 8. Interfund Lending
Pursuant to an exemptive order granted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Fund entered into a master interfund lending agreement (the Interfund Program) with certain other funds advised by the Investment Manager or its affiliates (each a Participating Fund). The Interfund Program allows each Participating Fund to lend money directly to and, other than closed-end funds (including the Fund) and money market funds, borrow money directly from other Participating Funds for temporary purposes through the Interfund Program (each an Interfund Loan).
A Participating Fund may make unsecured borrowings under the Interfund Program if its outstanding borrowings from all sources, including those outside of the Interfund Program, immediately after such unsecured borrowing under the Interfund Program are equal to or less than 10% of its total assets, provided that if the borrowing Participating Fund has a secured loan outstanding from any other lender, including but not limited to another Participating Fund, the borrowing Participating Fund’s borrowing under the Interfund Program will be secured on at least an equal priority basis with at least an equivalent percentage of collateral to loan value as any outstanding loan that requires collateral. A Participating Fund may not borrow through the Interfund Program or from any other source if its total outstanding borrowings immediately after a borrowing would be more than 33 1/3% of its total assets or any lower threshold provided for by a Participating Fund’s fundamental or non-fundamental policy restriction.
No Participating Fund may lend to another Participating Fund through the Interfund Program if the loan would cause the lending Participating Fund’s aggregate outstanding loans under the Interfund Program to exceed 15% of its current net assets at the time of the loan. A Participating Fund’s Interfund Loans to any one Participating Fund may not exceed 5% of the lending Participating Fund’s net assets at the time of the loan. The duration of Interfund Loans will be limited to the time required to receive payment for securities sold, but in no event more than seven days. Interfund Loans effected within seven days of each other will be treated as separate loan transactions for purposes of this limitation. Each Interfund Loan may be called on one business day’s notice by a lending Participating Fund and may be repaid on any day by a borrowing Participating Fund.
Loans under the Interfund Program are subject to the risk that the borrowing Participating Fund could be unable to repay the loan when due, and a delay in repayment to the lending Participating Fund could result in a lost opportunity by the lending Participating Fund to invest those loaned assets and additional lending costs. Because the Investment Manager provides investment management services to both borrowing and lending Participating Funds, the Investment Manager may have a potential conflict of interest in determining that an Interfund Loan is comparable in credit quality to other high-quality money market instruments. The Participating Fund has adopted policies and procedures that are designed to manage potential conflicts of interest, but the administration of the Interfund Program may be subject to such conflicts.
As noted above, the Fund may only participate in the Interfund Program as a Lending Fund. The Fund did not lend money under the Interfund Program during the year ended December 31, 2021.
Note 9. Investments in illiquid investments
The Fund may not acquire any illiquid investment if, immediately after the acquisition, the Fund would have invested more than 15% of Managed Assets in illiquid investments that are assets. For these purposes, an “illiquid investment” means any investment that the Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment.
Note 10. Significant risks
Active management risk
Due to its active management, the Fund could underperform its benchmark index and/or other funds with similar investment objectives.
Foreign securities risk
Investments in or exposure to foreign companies involve certain risks not associated with investments in or exposure to securities of U.S. companies. Investing in foreign companies subjects the Fund to the risks associated with issuer’s (and any of its related companies’) country of organization and places of business operations and exposures, including political,
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
35

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
regulatory, economic, social, diplomatic and other conditions or events (including, for example, military confrontations, war, terrorism, natural disasters and disease pandemics), occurring in the country or region, as well as risks associated with less developed custody and settlement practices. Foreign securities may be more volatile and less liquid than securities of U.S. companies, and are subject to the risks associated with potential imposition of economic and other sanctions against a particular foreign country, its nationals or industries or businesses within the country. In addition, foreign governments may impose withholding or other taxes on the Fund’s income, capital gains or proceeds from the disposition of foreign securities, which could reduce the Fund’s return on such securities.
Securities issued by foreign governments or companies in emerging market countries may have greater exposure to the risks of investing in foreign securities. Emerging market countries are more likely to experience instability resulting, for example, from rapid changes or developments in social, political, economic or other conditions. Their economies are usually less mature and their securities markets are typically less developed with more limited trading activity (i.e., lower trading volumes and less liquidity) than more developed countries. Emerging market securities tend to be more volatile than securities in more developed markets. Many emerging market countries are heavily dependent on international trade and have fewer trading partners, which makes them more sensitive to world commodity prices and economic downturns in other countries, and some have a higher risk of currency devaluations. The financial information and disclosure made available by issuers of emerging market securities may be considerably less reliable than publicly available information about other foreign securities.
The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, which regulates auditors of U.S. public companies, is unable to inspect audit work papers in certain foreign countries. Investors in foreign countries often have limited rights and few practical remedies to pursue shareholder claims, including class actions or fraud claims, and the ability of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice and other authorities to bring and enforce actions against foreign issuers or foreign persons is limited.
Information technology sector risk
The Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in technology and technology-related companies. The market prices of technology and technology-related stocks tend to exhibit a greater degree of market risk and price volatility than other types of investments. These stocks may fall in and out of favor with investors rapidly, which may cause sudden selling and dramatically lower market prices. These stocks also may be affected adversely by changes in technology, consumer and business purchasing patterns, government regulation and/or obsolete products or services. In addition, a rising interest rate environment tends to negatively affect technology and technology-related companies. In such an environment, those companies with high market valuations may appear less attractive to investors, which may cause sharp decreases in the companies’ market prices. Further, those technology or technology-related companies seeking to finance their expansion would have increased borrowing costs, which may negatively impact their earnings. As a result, these factors may negatively affect the performance of the Fund. Finally, the Fund may be susceptible to factors affecting the technology and technology-related industries, and the Fund’s net asset value may fluctuate more than a fund that invests in a wider range of industries. Technology and technology-related companies are often smaller and less experienced companies and may be subject to greater risks than larger companies, such as limited product lines, markets and financial and managerial resources. These risks may be heightened for technology companies in foreign markets. Some companies in the information technology sector are facing increased government and regulatory scrutiny and may be subject to adverse government or regulatory action, which could negatively impact the value of their securities.
Issuer risk
An issuer in which the Fund invests or to which it has exposure may perform poorly or below expectations and the value of its securities may therefore decline, which may negatively affect the Fund’s performance. Underperformance of an issuer may be caused by poor management decisions, competitive pressures, breakthroughs in technology, reliance on suppliers, labor problems or shortages, corporate restructurings, fraudulent disclosures, natural disasters, military confrontations, war, terrorism, disease/virus outbreaks, epidemics or other events, conditions and factors which may impair the value of an investment in the Fund.
36 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
Large-capitalization risk
Stocks of large-capitalization companies have at times experienced periods of volatility and negative performance. During such periods, the value of the stocks may decline and the Fund’s performance may be negatively affected.
Leverage risk
Leverage occurs when the Fund increases its assets available for investment using derivatives, or similar instruments or techniques. Use of leverage can produce volatility and may exaggerate changes in the NAV of Fund shares and in the return on the Fund’s portfolio, which may increase the risk of loss. If the Fund uses leverage, through the purchase of particular instruments such as derivatives, the Fund may experience capital losses. Leverage presents the opportunity for increased net income and capital gains, but may also exaggerate the Fund’s volatility and risk of loss. There can be no guarantee that a leveraging strategy will be successful.
Market risk
The Fund may incur losses due to declines in the value of one or more securities in which it invests. These declines may be due to factors affecting a particular issuer, or the result of, among other things, political, regulatory, market, economic or social developments affecting the relevant market(s) more generally. In addition, turbulence in financial markets and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and/or fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers, which could adversely affect the Fund, including causing difficulty in assigning prices to hard-to-value assets in thinly traded and closed markets, significant redemptions and operational challenges. Global economies and financial markets are increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. These risks may be magnified if certain events or developments adversely interrupt the global supply chain; in these and other circumstances, such risks might affect companies worldwide. As a result, local, regional or global events such as terrorism, war, natural disasters, disease/virus outbreaks and epidemics or other public health issues, recessions, depressions or other events – or the potential for such events – could have a significant negative impact on global economic and market conditions.
The coronavirus disease 2019 and its variants (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in, and may continue to result in, significant global economic and societal disruption and market volatility due to disruptions in market access, resource availability, facilities operations, imposition of tariffs, export controls and supply chain disruption, among others. Such disruptions may be caused, or exacerbated by, quarantines and travel restrictions, workforce displacement and loss in human and other resources. The uncertainty surrounding the magnitude, duration, reach, costs and effects of the global pandemic, as well as actions that have been or could be taken by governmental authorities or other third parties, present unknowns that are yet to unfold. The impacts, as well as the uncertainty over impacts to come, of COVID-19 – and any other infectious illness outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics that may arise in the future – could negatively affect global economies and markets in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. In addition, the impact of infectious illness outbreaks and epidemics in emerging market countries may be greater due to generally less established healthcare systems, governments and financial markets. Public health crises caused by the COVID-19 outbreak may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks in certain countries or globally. The disruptions caused by COVID-19 could prevent the Fund from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner and negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objectives. Any such event(s) could have a significant adverse impact on the value and risk profile of the Fund.
Non-diversification risk
A non-diversified fund is permitted to invest a greater percentage of its total assets in fewer issuers than a diversified fund. This increases the risk that a change in the value of any one investment held by the Fund could affect the overall value of the Fund more than it would affect that of a diversified fund holding a greater number of investments. Accordingly, the Fund’s value will likely be more volatile than the value of a more diversified fund.
Options risk
The Fund engages in transactions in options on securities, indices, exchange traded funds and market baskets of securities on exchanges and in the OTC markets. In general, exchange-traded options have standardized exercise prices and expiration dates and require the parties to post margin against their obligations, and the performance of the parties’ obligations in
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
37

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
connection with such options is guaranteed by the exchange or a related clearing corporation. OTC options have more flexible terms negotiated between the buyer and the seller, but generally do not require the parties to post margin and are subject to greater credit risk. OTC options also involve greater liquidity risk.
In addition to writing call options as described above, the Fund may purchase put options. By buying a put option, the Fund will pay a premium to acquire a right to sell the securities or instruments underlying the put at the exercise price of the option. The Fund will lose money if the securities or instruments underlying the option do not decline in value below the exercise price of the option by an amount sufficient to offset the premium paid to acquire the option. To the extent the Fund purchases put options in the OTC market, the Fund will be subject to the credit risk of the seller of the option. The Fund also may write put options on the types of securities or instruments that may be held by the Fund, provided that such put options are secured by segregated, liquid instruments. The Fund will receive a premium for writing a put option, which increases the Fund’s return. In exchange for the premium received, the Fund has the obligation to buy the securities or instruments underlying the option at an agreed-upon exercise price if the securities or instruments decrease below the exercise price of the option.
The Fund will lose money if the securities or instruments decrease in value so that the amount the Fund is obligated to pay the counterparty to the option to purchase the securities underlying the option upon exercise of the option exceeds the value of those securities by an amount that is greater than the premium received by the Fund for writing the option.
The Fund may purchase call options on any of the types of securities or instruments in which it may invest. In exchange for paying the option premium, a purchased call option gives the Fund the right to buy, and obligates the seller to sell, the underlying security or instrument at the exercise price. The Fund will lose money if the securities or instruments underlying the option do not appreciate in value in an amount sufficient to offset the premium paid by the Fund to acquire the option.
Small and mid-cap companies risk
The Fund may invest all or a substantial portion of its Managed Assets in small- and mid-capitalization companies (small- and mid-cap companies). Investments in small- and mid-cap companies often involve greater risks than investments in larger companies because small- and mid-cap companies tend to have less predictable earnings and may lack the management experience, financial resources, product diversification and competitive strengths of larger companies. Securities of small- and mid-cap companies may trade less frequently and in smaller volumes and may be less liquid and fluctuate more sharply in value than securities of larger companies. This means that the Fund could have greater difficulty selling such securities at the time and price that the Fund would like. During periods of investor uncertainty, investor sentiment may favor large, well-known companies over smaller, lesser-known companies which may adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investment in small- and mid-cap companies and the value of your investment in the Fund.
Writing call options risk
A principal aspect of the Fund’s investment strategy involves writing call options on the NASDAQ 100. This part of the Fund’s strategy subjects the Fund to certain additional risks. A decision as to whether, when and how to use options involves the exercise of skill and judgment, and even a well-conceived transaction may be unsuccessful to some degree because of market behavior or unexpected events. The principal factors affecting the market value of an option include supply and demand, interest rates, the current market price of the underlying index or security in relation to the exercise price of the option, the actual or perceived volatility of the underlying index or security and the time remaining until the expiration date.
The Fund intends to write call options on the NASDAQ 100; however, it does not intend to have a portfolio of securities that mirrors the securities in the NASDAQ 100. As a result, during a period when the Fund has outstanding call options written on the NASDAQ 100, the NASDAQ 100 may appreciate to a greater extent than the securities in the Fund’s portfolio. If the call options are exercised in these circumstances, the Fund’s loss on the options will be greater because it will be paying the option holder not only an amount effectively representing appreciation on securities in its own portfolio but also an amount representing the greater appreciation experienced by the securities in the NASDAQ 100 that the Fund does not own. If, at a time these call options may be exercised, the securities underlying these options have market values above the exercise price, then these call options will be exercised and the Fund will be obligated to deliver to the option holder either the securities underlying these options or to deliver the cash value of those securities, in exchange for which the option holder
38 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
will pay the Fund the exercise price. In either case, the Fund will incur losses to the extent the market value of the underlying securities exceed the sum of the premium the Fund received from writing the call options and the exercise price of the call options, which loss may be very substantial.
To the extent all or part of the Fund’s call options are covered, the Fund forgoes, during the option’s life, the opportunity to profit from increases in the market value of the security underlying the call option above the sum of the option premium received and the exercise price of the call, but has retained the risk of loss should the price of the underlying security decline below the exercise price minus the option premium received. The writer of an exchange-listed option on a security has no control over when during the exercise period of the option (which may be a single day or multiple days) it may be required to fulfill its obligation as a writer of the option. Once an option writer has received an exercise notice, it would be obligated to deliver the underlying security at the exercise price. Thus, the writing of call options may require the Fund to sell portfolio securities at inopportune times or for prices other than current market values and will limit the amount of appreciation the Fund can realize above the exercise price of an option.
The Fund may be required to sell investments from its portfolio to effect cash settlement (or transfer ownership of a stock or other instrument to physically settle) on any written call options that are exercised. Such sales (or transfers) may occur at inopportune times, and the Fund may incur transaction costs that increase the costs borne by Common Stockholders. The Fund may sell written call options over an exchange or in the OTC market. The options in the OTC markets may not be as liquid as exchange-listed options. The Fund may be limited in the number of counterparties willing to take positions opposite the Fund or may find the terms of such counterparties to be less favorable than the terms available for listed options. The Fund cannot guarantee that its options strategies will be effective. Moreover, OTC options may provide less favorable tax treatment than listed options.
The value of options may be adversely affected if the market for such options becomes less liquid or smaller. There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist when the Fund seeks to close out an option position, in the case of a call option written, by buying the option back. Reasons for the absence of a liquid secondary market on an exchange include the following: (i) there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; (ii) restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; (iii) trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options; (iv) unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; (v) the facilities of an exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation (OCC) may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading volume; or (vi) one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options) at some future date. If trading were discontinued, the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist. However, outstanding options on that exchange that had been issued by the OCC as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms. The Fund’s ability to terminate OTC options will be more limited than with exchange-traded options and may involve the risk that broker-dealers participating in such transactions will not fulfill their obligations.
The hours of trading for options may not conform to the hours during which the underlying securities are traded. To the extent that the options markets close before the markets for the underlying securities, significant price and rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that would not be reflected concurrently in the options markets. Call options are marked to market daily and their value will be affected by changes in the value of and dividend rates of the underlying common stocks, changes in interest rates, changes in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market and the underlying common stocks and the remaining time to the options’ expiration.
Additionally, the exercise price of an option may be adjusted downward before the option’s expiration as a result of the occurrence of certain corporate events affecting the underlying equity security, such as extraordinary dividends, stock splits, merger or other extraordinary distributions or events. A reduction in the exercise price of an option would reduce the Fund’s capital appreciation potential on the underlying security.
The Fund’s options transactions will be subject to limitations established by each of the exchanges, boards of trade or other trading facilities on which such options are traded. These limitations govern the maximum number of options in each class which may be written or purchased by a single investor or group of investors acting in concert, regardless of whether the options are written or purchased on the same or different exchanges, boards of trade or other trading facilities or are held or
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
39

Notes to Financial Statements  (continued)
December 31, 2021
written in one or more accounts or through one or more brokers. Thus, the number of options which the Fund may write or purchase may be affected by options written or purchased by other investment advisory clients of the Investment Manager. An exchange, board of trade or other trading facility may order the liquidation of positions found to be in excess of these limits, and may impose certain other sanctions.
Note 11. Subsequent events
Management has evaluated the events and transactions that have occurred through the date the financial statements were issued and noted no items requiring adjustment of the financial statements or additional disclosure.
Note 12. Information regarding pending and settled legal proceedings
Ameriprise Financial and certain of its affiliates have historically been involved in a number of legal, arbitration and regulatory proceedings, including routine litigation, class actions, and governmental actions, concerning matters arising in connection with the conduct of their business activities. Ameriprise Financial believes that the Fund is not currently the subject of, and that neither Ameriprise Financial nor any of its affiliates are the subject of, any pending legal, arbitration or regulatory proceedings that are likely to have a material adverse effect on the Fund or the ability of Ameriprise Financial or its affiliates to perform under their contracts with the Fund. Ameriprise Financial is required to make quarterly (10-Q), annual (10-K) and, as necessary, 8-K filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on legal and regulatory matters that relate to Ameriprise Financial and its affiliates. Copies of these filings may be obtained by accessing the SEC website at www.sec.gov.
There can be no assurance that these matters, or the adverse publicity associated with them, will not result in increased Fund redemptions, reduced sale of Fund shares or other adverse consequences to the Fund. Further, although we believe proceedings are not likely to have a material adverse effect on the Fund or the ability of Ameriprise Financial or its affiliates to perform under their contracts with the Fund, these proceedings are subject to uncertainties and, as such, we are unable to estimate the possible loss or range of loss that may result. An adverse outcome in one or more of these proceedings could result in adverse judgments, settlements, fines, penalties or other relief that could have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial condition or results of operations of Ameriprise Financial or one or more of its affiliates that provides services to the Fund.
40 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.
Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying statement of assets and liabilities, including the portfolio of investments, of Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc. (the "Fund") as of December 31, 2021, the related statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2021, the statement of changes in net assets for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2021, including the related notes, and the financial highlights for each of the five years in the period ended December 31, 2021 (collectively referred to as the "financial statements"). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Fund as of December 31, 2021, the results of its operations for the year then ended, the changes in its net assets for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2021 and the financial highlights for each of the five years in the period ended December 31, 2021 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Fund’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Fund’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Fund in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits of these financial statements in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud.
Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. Our procedures included confirmation of securities owned as of December 31, 2021 by correspondence with the custodian, transfer agent and brokers; when replies were not received from brokers, we performed other auditing procedures. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
/s/PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Minneapolis, Minnesota
February 18, 2022
We have served as the auditor of one or more investment companies within the Columbia Funds Complex since 1977.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
41

 Federal Income Tax Information
(Unaudited)
The Fund hereby designates the following tax attributes for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.
Qualified
dividend
income
Dividends
received
deduction
Capital
gain
dividend
39.82% 38.68% $63,890,207
Qualified dividend income. For taxable, non-corporate stockholders, the percentage of ordinary income distributed during the fiscal year that represents qualified dividend income subject to reduced tax rates.
Dividends received deduction. The percentage of ordinary income distributed during the fiscal year that qualifies for the corporate dividends received deduction.
Capital gain dividend. The Fund designates as a capital gain dividend the amount reflected above, or if subsequently determined to be different, the net capital gain of such fiscal period.
 Directors and Officers
Stockholders elect the Board that oversees the Fund’s operations and appoints officers who are responsible for day-to-day business decisions based on policies set by the Board. The following table provides basic biographical information about the Fund’s Directors as of the printing of this report, including their principal occupations during the past five years, although specific titles for individuals may have varied over the period. The Directors may have served as a Trustee to other Funds in the Columbia Funds Complex prior to the date set forth in the Position Held with the Fund and Length of Service column. Under current Board policy, Directors may serve a term of three years, whereupon they may be re-elected to serve another term (the Fund’s Board has three classes, with one class expiring each year at the Fund’s regular stockholder’s meeting), or, for Directors not affiliated with the Investment Manager, generally may serve through the end of the calendar year in which they reach the mandatory retirement age established by the Board.
Independent directors
Name, Address,
Year of Birth
Position Held
With the Fund and
Length of Service
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past Five Years
and Other Relevant
Professional Experience
Number of
Funds in the
Columbia Funds
Complex
Overseen
Other Directorships
Held by Director
During the Past
Five Years
George S. Batejan
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1953
Director since January 2018 Executive Vice President, Global Head of Technology and Operations, Janus Capital Group, Inc., 2010-2016 176 Former Chairman of the Board, NICSA (National Investment Company Services Association) (Executive Committee, Nominating Committee and Governance Committee), 2014-2016; former Director, Intech Investment Management, 2011-2016; former Board Member, Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce, 2015-2016; former Advisory Board Member, University of Colorado Business School, 2015-2018
42 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Directors and Officers  (continued)
 
Independent directors  (continued)
Name, Address,
Year of Birth
Position Held
With the Fund and
Length of Service
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past Five Years
and Other Relevant
Professional Experience
Number of
Funds in the
Columbia Funds
Complex
Overseen
Other Directorships
Held by Director
During the Past
Five Years
Kathleen Blatz
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1954
Director since October 2009 Attorney, specializing in arbitration and mediation; Chief Justice, Minnesota Supreme Court, 1998-2006; Associate Justice, Minnesota Supreme Court, 1996-1998; Fourth Judicial District Court Judge, Hennepin County, 1994-1996; Attorney in private practice and public service, 1984-1993; State Representative, Minnesota House of Representatives, 1979-1993, which included service on the Tax and Financial Institutions and Insurance Committees; Member and Interim Chair, Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, January-July 2017; Interim President and Chief Executive Officer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minneota (health care insurance), February-July 2018, April-October 2021 176 Former Trustee, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota, 2009-2021 (Chair of the Business Development Committee, 2014-2017; Chair of the Governance Committee, 2017-2019); former Member and Chair of the Board, Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, January-July 2017; former Director, Robina Foundation, 2009-2020 (Chair, 2014-2020); Director, Schulze Family Foundation, since 2021
Pamela G. Carlton
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1954
Director since October 2009 President, Springboard — Partners in Cross Cultural Leadership (consulting company) since 2003; Managing Director of US Equity Research, JP Morgan Chase, 1999-2003; Director of US Equity Research, Chase Asset Management, 1996-1999; Co-Director Latin America Research, 1993-1996, COO Global Research, 1992-1996, Co-Director of US Research, 1991-1992, Investment Banker, 1982-1991, Morgan Stanley; Attorney, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, 1980-1982 176 Trustee, New York Presbyterian Hospital Board (Executive Committee and Chair of People Committee) since 1996; Director, DR Bank (Audit Committee) since 2017; Director, Evercore Inc. (Audit Committee); Director, Apollo Commercial Real Estate Finance, Inc. since 2021; the Governing Council of the Independent Directors Council (IDC), since 2021
Patricia M. Flynn
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1950
Director since October 2009 Trustee Professor of Economics and Management, Bentley University since 1976 (also teaches and conducts research on corporate governance); Dean, McCallum Graduate School of Business, Bentley University, 1992-2002 176 Trustee, MA Taxpayers Foundation since 1997; Board of Governors, Innovation Institute, MA Technology Collaborative, 2010-2020; former Board of Directors, The MA Business Roundtable, 2003-2019
Brian J. Gallagher
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1954
Director since January 2020 Retired; Partner with Deloitte & Touche LLP and its predecessors, 1977 - 2016 176 Trustee, Catholic Schools Foundation since 2004
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
43

Directors and Officers  (continued)
 
Independent directors  (continued)
Name, Address,
Year of Birth
Position Held
With the Fund and
Length of Service
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past Five Years
and Other Relevant
Professional Experience
Number of
Funds in the
Columbia Funds
Complex
Overseen
Other Directorships
Held by Director
During the Past
Five Years
Douglas A. Hacker
c/o Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1955
Director since January 2022 Independent business executive since May 2006; Executive Vice President – Strategy of United Airlines, December 2002-May 2006; President of UAL Loyalty Services (airline marketing company), September 2001-December 2002; Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of United Airlines, July 1999-September 2001 176 Director, Spartan Nash Company (food distributor); Director, Aircastle Limited (Chair of Audit Committee) (aircraft leasing); former Director, Nash Finch Company (food distributor), 2005-2013; former Director, SeaCube Container Leasing Ltd. (container leasing), 2010-2013; and former Director, Travelport Worldwide Limited (travel information technology), 2014-2019
Catherine James Paglia
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1952
Director since October 2009; Chair of the Board since January 2020 Director, Enterprise Asset Management, Inc. (private real estate and asset management company) since September 1998; Managing Director and Partner, Interlaken Capital, Inc., 1989-1997; Vice President, 1982-1985, Principal, 1985-1987, Managing Director, 1987-1989, Morgan Stanley; Vice President, Investment Banking, 1980-1982, Associate, Investment Banking, 1976-1980, Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc. 176 Director, Valmont Industries, Inc. irrigation systems manufacturer) since 2012; Trustee, Carleton College (on the Investment Committee); Trustee, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (on the Investment Committee)
Minor M. Shaw
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1947
Director since April 2016 President, Micco LLC (private investments) since 2011; President, Micco Corp. (family investment business), 1998-2011 176 Director, Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina (Chair of Compensation Committee) since April 2008; Trustee, Hollingsworth Funds (on the Investment Committee) since 2016 (previously Board Chair from 2016-2019); Former Advisory Board member, Duke Energy Corp., 2016-2020; Chair of the Duke Endowment; Chair of Greenville – Spartanburg Airport Commission; former Trustee, BofA Funds Series Trust (11 funds), 2003-2011; former Director, Piedmont Natural Gas, 2004-2016; former Director, National Association of Corporate Directors, Carolinas Chapter, 2013-2018; Chair, Daniel-Mickel Foundation since 1998
Sandra Yeager
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers, LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1964
Director since June 2020 Retired; President and founder, Hanoverian Capital, LLC (SEC registered investment advisor firm), 2008-2016; Managing Director, DuPont Capital, 2006-2008; Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Investment Management, 2004-2006; Senior Vice President, Alliance Bernstein, 1990-2004 176 Former Director, NAPE Education Foundation, October 2016-October 2020
44 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

Directors and Officers  (continued)
 
Interested director affiliated with Investment Manager*
Name,
Address,
Year of Birth
Position Held
With the Fund and
Length of Service
Principal Occupation(s)
During the Past Five Years
and Other Relevant
Professional Experience
Number of
Funds in the
Columbia Funds
Complex
Overseen
Other Directorships Held
by Director During the
Past Five Years
Daniel J. Beckman
c/o Columbia Management
Investment Advisers, LLC
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1962
Director since November 2021(a) Vice President – Head of North America Product, Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC (since April 2015); officer of Columbia Funds and affiliated funds since 2020 176 Director, Ameriprise Trust Company, since October 2016; Director, Columbia Management Investment Distributors, Inc. since November 2018; Board of Governors, Columbia Wanger Asset Management, LLC since January 2022
* Interested person (as defined under the 1940 Act) by reason of being an officer, director, security holder and/or employee of the Investment Manager or Ameriprise Financial.
(a) Mr. Beckman serves as the President and Principal Executive Officer of the Columbia Funds (since 2021).
The Board has appointed officers who are responsible for day-to-day business decisions based on policies it has established. The officers serve at the pleasure of the Board. The following table provides basic information about the Officers of the Fund as of the printing of this report, including principal occupations during the past five years, although their specific titles may have varied over the period. In addition to Mr. Beckman, who is the President and Principal Executive Officer, the Fund’s other officers are:
Fund officers
Name,
address and
year of birth
Position and year
first appointed to
position for any Fund
in the Columbia
Funds complex or a
predecessor thereof
Principal occupation(s) during past five years
Michael G. Clarke
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1969
Chief Financial Officer and Principal Financial Officer (2009) and Senior Vice President (2019) Vice President and Head of Global Operations & Investor Services, Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC, since March 2022 (previously Vice President, Head of North American Operations, and Co-Head of Global Operations, June 2019 to February 2022 and Vice President – Accounting and Tax, May 2010 - May 2019); senior officer of Columbia Funds and affiliated funds since 2002.
Joseph Beranek
5890 Ameriprise
Financial Center
Minneapolis, MN 55474
1965
Treasurer and Chief Accounting Officer (Principal Accounting Officer) (2019) and Principal Financial Officer (2020) Vice President — Mutual Fund Accounting and Financial Reporting, Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC, since December 2018 and March 2017, respectively (previously, Vice President — Pricing and Corporate Actions, May 2010-March 2017).
William F. Truscott
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1960
Senior Vice President (2001) Formerly, Trustee/Director of Columbia Funds Complex or legacy funds, November 2001-January 1, 2021; Chief Executive Officer, Global Asset Management, Ameriprise Financial, Inc. since September 2012; Chairman of the Board and President, Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC since July 2004 and February 2012, respectively; Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Columbia Management Investment Distributors, Inc. since November 2008 and February 2012, respectively; Chairman of the Board and Director, Threadneedle Asset Management Holdings, Sàrl since March 2013 and December 2008, respectively; senior executive of various entities affiliated with Columbia Threadneedle.
Christopher O. Petersen
5228 Ameriprise Financial Center
Minneapolis, MN 55474
1970
Senior Vice President and Assistant Secretary (2021) Formerly, Trustee/Director of funds within the Columbia Funds Complex, July 1, 2020 - November 22, 2021; Senior Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, Ameriprise Financial, Inc. since September 2021 (previously Vice President and Lead Chief Counsel, January 2015 - September 2021); President and Principal Executive Officer of the Columbia Funds 2015 - 2021; officer of Columbia Funds and affiliated funds since 2007.
Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021
45

Directors and Officers  (continued)
 
Fund officers  (continued)
Name,
address and
year of birth
Position and year
first appointed to
position for any Fund
in the Columbia
Funds complex or a
predecessor thereof
Principal occupation(s) during past five years
Thomas P. McGuire
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1972
Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer (2012) Vice President – Asset Management Compliance, Ameriprise Financial, Inc., since May 2010; Chief Compliance Officer, Columbia Acorn/Wanger Funds since December 2015; Chief Compliance Officer, Ameriprise Certificate Company, September 2010 – September 2020.
Ryan C. Larrenaga
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1970
Senior Vice President (2017), Chief Legal Officer (2017), and Secretary (2015) Vice President and Chief Counsel, Ameriprise Financial, Inc. since August 2018 (previously, Vice President and Group Counsel, August 2011 – August 2018); Chief Legal Officer, Columbia Acorn/Wanger Funds, since September 2020; officer of Columbia Funds and affiliated funds since 2005.
Michael E. DeFao
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
1968
Vice President (2011) and Assistant Secretary (2010) Vice President and Chief Counsel, Ameriprise Financial, Inc. since May 2010; Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Assistant Secretary, Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC since October 2021 (previously Vice President and Assistant Secretary, May 2010 – September 2021).
Lyn Kephart-Strong
5228 Ameriprise
Financial Center
Minneapolis, MN 55474
1960
Vice President (2015) President, Columbia Management Investment Services Corp. since October 2014; Vice President & Resolution Officer, Ameriprise Trust Company since August 2009.
46 Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.  | Annual Report 2021

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Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc.
290 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
  
You should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of the Fund carefully before investing. You can obtain the Fund’s most recent periodic reports and other regulatory filings by contacting your financial advisor or American Stock Transfer & Trust Company at 866.666.1532 or 6201 15th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219. These reports and other filings can also be found on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s EDGAR Database. You should read these reports and other filings carefully before investing.
Columbia Threadneedle Investments (Columbia Threadneedle) is the global brand name of the Columbia and Threadneedle group of companies. All rights reserved. Columbia Management Investment Distributors, Inc., 290 Congress Street, Boston, MA 02210.
© 2022 Columbia Management Investment Advisers, LLC.
columbiathreadneedleus.com/investor/
ANN221_12_M01_(02/22)

Item 2. Code of Ethics.

(a)The registrant has adopted a code of ethics that applies to the registrant's principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions, regardless of whether these individuals are employed by the registrant or a third party.

(b)During the period covered by this report, there were not any amendments to a provision of the code of ethics that applies to the registrant's principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions, regardless of whether these individuals are employed by the registrant or a third party, and that relates to any element of the code of ethics definition enumerated in paragraph (b) of this Item.

(c)During the period covered by this report, there were no waivers, including any implicit waivers, from a provision of the code of ethics to the registrant's principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions, regardless of whether these individuals are employed by the registrant or a third party that relates to one or more of the items set forth in paragraph (b) of this Item.

Item 3. Audit Committee Financial Expert.

The registrant's Board of Trustees has determined that Brian J. Gallagher and Sandra L. Yeager, each of whom are members of the registrant's Board of Trustees and Audit Committee, each qualify as an audit committee financial expert. Mr. Gallagher and Ms. Yeager are each independent trustees, as defined in paragraph (a)(2) of this item's instructions.

Item 4. Principal Accountant Fees and Services.

Fee information below is disclosed for the one series of the registrant whose report to stockholders is included in this annual filing.

(a)Audit Fees. Aggregate Audit Fees billed by the principal accountant for professional services rendered during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31,

2020 are approximately as follows:

20212020

$49,500    $39,500

Audit Fees include amounts related to the audit of the registrant's annual financial statements or services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for those fiscal years.

 

(b)Audit-Related Fees. Aggregate Audit-Related Fees billed to the registrant by the principal accountant for professional services rendered during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are approximately as follows:

2021

2020

$0

$0

Audit-Related, if any, Fees include amounts for assurance and related services by the principal accountant that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit of the registrant's financial statements and are not reported in Audit Fees above.

During the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, there were no Audit-Related Fees billed by the registrant's principal accountant to the registrant's investment adviser (not including any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is subcontracted with or overseen by another investment adviser) and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant for an engagement that related directly to the operations and financial reporting of the registrant.

(c)Tax Fees. Aggregate Tax Fees billed by the principal accountant to the registrant for professional services rendered during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are approximately as follows:

2021

2020

$0

$0

Tax Fees, if any, include amounts for the review of annual tax returns, the review of required shareholder distribution calculations and typically include amounts for professional services by the principal accountant for tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.

During the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, there were no Tax Fees billed by the registrant's principal accountant to the registrant's investment adviser (not including any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is subcontracted with or overseen by another investment adviser) and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant for an engagement that related directly to the operations and financial reporting of the registrant.

(d)All Other Fees. Aggregate All Other Fees billed by the principal accountant to the registrant for professional services rendered during the fiscal years ended December 31,

2021 and December 31, 2020 are approximately as follows:

2021

2020

$0

$0

 

All Other Fees, if any, include amounts for products and services provided by the principal accountant, other than the services reported in paragraphs (a) through (c) above.

Aggregate All Other Fees billed by the registrant's principal accountant to the registrant's investment adviser (not including any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is subcontracted with or overseen by another investment adviser) and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant for an engagement that related directly to the operations and financial reporting of the registrant during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are approximately as follows:

20212020

$520,000     $520,000

In both fiscal years 2021 and 2020, All Other Fees primarily consist of fees billed for internal control examinations of the registrant's transfer agent and investment advisor.

(e)(1) Audit Committee Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

The registrant's Audit Committee is required to pre-approve the engagement of the registrant's independent auditors to provide audit and non-audit services to the registrant and non-audit services to its investment adviser (excluding any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is sub-contracted or overseen by another investment adviser (the "Adviser") or any entity controlling, controlled by or under common control with the Adviser that provides ongoing services to the Fund (a "Control Affiliate") if the engagement relates directly to the operations and financial reporting of the registrant.

The Audit Committee has adopted a Policy for Engagement of Independent Auditors for Audit and Non-Audit Services (the "Policy"). The Policy sets forth the understanding of the Audit Committee regarding the engagement of the registrant's independent accountants to provide (i) audit and permissible audit-related, tax and other services to the registrant ("Fund Services"); (ii) non-audit services to the registrant's Adviser and any Control Affiliates, that relates directly to the operations and financial reporting of a Fund ("Fund-related Adviser Services"); and (iii) certain other audit and non-audit services to the registrant's Adviser and its Control Affiliates. A service will require specific pre-approval by the Audit Committee if it is to be provided by the Fund's independent auditor; provided, however, that pre-approval of non-audit services to the Fund, the Adviser or Control Affiliates may be waived if certain de minimis requirements set forth in the SEC's rules are met.

Under the Policy, the Audit Committee may delegate pre-approval authority to any pre- designated member or members who are independent board members. The member(s) to whom such authority is delegated must report, for informational purposes only, any pre- approval decisions to the Audit Committee at its next regular meeting. The Audit Committee's responsibilities with respect to the pre-approval of services performed by the independent auditor may not be delegated to management.

 

On an annual basis, at a regularly scheduled Audit Committee meeting, the Fund's Treasurer or other Fund officer shall submit to the Audit Committee a schedule of the types of Fund Services and Fund-related Adviser Services that are subject to specific pre- approval. This schedule will provide a description of each type of service that is subject to specific pre-approval, along with total projected fees for each service. The pre- approval will generally cover a one-year period. The Audit Committee will review and approve the types of services and the projected fees for the next one-year period and may add to, or subtract from, the list of pre-approved services from time to time, based on subsequent determinations. This specific approval acknowledges that the Audit Committee is in agreement with the specific types of services that the independent auditor will be permitted to perform and the projected fees for each service.

The Fund's Treasurer or other Fund officer shall report to the Audit Committee at each of its regular meetings regarding all Fund Services or Fund-related Adviser Services provided since the last such report was rendered, including a description of the services, by category, with forecasted fees for the annual reporting period, proposed changes requiring specific pre-approval and a description of services provided by the independent auditor, by category, with actual fees during the current reporting period.

*****

(e)(2) None, or 0%, of the Audit-Related Fees, Tax Fees and All Other Fees paid by the Fund or affiliated entities relating directly to the operations and financial reporting of the Registrant disclosed above were approved by the audit committee pursuant to paragraphs (c)(7)(i)(C) of Rule 2-01 of Regulation S-X (which permits audit committee approval after the start of the engagement with respect to services other than audit, review or attest services, if certain conditions are satisfied).

(f)Not applicable.

(g)The aggregate non-audit fees billed by the registrant's accountant for services rendered to the registrant, and rendered to the registrant's investment adviser (not including any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is subcontracted with or overseen by another investment adviser), and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are approximately as follows:

20212020

$520,000      $520,000

(h)The registrant's Audit Committee of the Board of Directors has considered whether the provision of non-audit services that were rendered to the registrant's adviser (not including any sub-adviser whose role is primarily portfolio management and is subcontracted with or overseen by another investment adviser), and any entity controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the investment adviser that provides ongoing services to the registrant that were not pre-approved pursuant to

 

paragraph (c)(7)(ii) of Rule 2-01 of Regulation S-X, is compatible with maintaining the principal accountant's independence.

Item 5. Audit Committee of Listed Registrants.

(a)The registrant has a separately-designated standing audit committee established in accordance with Section 3(a)58)(A) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(58)(A). Brian J. Gallagher and Sandra L. Yeager are each independent trustees and collectively constitute the entire Audit Committee.

(b)Not applicable.

Item 6. Investments

(a)The registrant's "Schedule I – Investments in securities of unaffiliated issuers" (as set forth in 17 CFR 210.12-12) is included in Item 1 of this Form N-CSR.

(b)Not applicable.

Item 7. Disclosure of Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures for Closed-End Management Investment Companies.

Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures

General. The Funds have delegated to the Investment Manager the responsibility to vote proxies relating to portfolio securities held by the Funds, including Funds managed by subadvisers. In deciding to delegate this responsibility to the Investment Manager, the Board reviewed the policies adopted by the Investment Manager. These included the procedures that the Investment Manager follows when a vote presents a conflict between the interests of the Funds and their shareholders and the Investment Manager and its affiliates.

The Investment Manager's policy is to vote all proxies for Fund securities in a manner considered by the Investment Manager to be in the best economic interests of its clients, including the Funds, without regard to any benefit or detriment to the Investment Manager, its employees or its affiliates. The best economic interests of clients is defined for this purpose as the interest of enhancing or protecting the value of client accounts, considered as a group rather than individually, as the Investment Manager determines in its discretion. The Investment Manager endeavors to vote all proxies of which it becomes aware prior to the vote deadline; provided, however, that in certain circumstances the Investment Manager may refrain from voting securities. For instance, the Investment Manager may refrain from voting foreign securities if it determines that the costs of voting outweigh the expected benefits of voting and typically will not vote securities if voting would impose trading restrictions.

 

The Board may, in its discretion, vote proxies for the Funds. For instance, the Board may determine to vote on matters that may present a material conflict of interest to the Investment Manager.

Oversight. The operation of the Investment Manager's proxy voting policy and procedures is overseen by a committee (the Proxy Voting Committee) composed of representatives of the Investment Manager's equity investments, equity research, responsible investment, compliance, legal and operations functions. The Proxy Voting Committee has the responsibility to review, at least annually, the Investment Manager's proxy voting policies to ensure consistency with internal policies, regulatory requirements, conflicts of interest and client disclosures. The Board reviews on an annual basis, or more frequently as determined appropriate, the Investment Manager's administration of the proxy voting process.

Corporate Governance and Proxy Voting Principles (the Principles). The Investment Manager has adopted the Principles, which set out the Investment Manager's views on key issues and the broad principles shaping its approach, as well as the types of related voting action the Investment Manager may take. The Principles also provide indicative examples of key guidelines used in any given region, which illustrate the standards against which voting decisions are considered. The Investment Manager has developed voting stances that align with the Principles and will generally vote in accordance with such voting stances. The Proxy Voting Committee or investment professionals may determine to vote differently from the voting stances on particular proposals in the event it determines that doing so is in the clients' best economic interests. The Investment Manager may also consider the voting recommendations of analysts, portfolio managers, subadvisers and information obtained from outside resources, including one or more third party research providers. When proposals are not covered by the voting stances or a voting determination must be made on a case-by-case basis, a portfolio manager, subadviser or analyst will make the voting determination based on his or her determination of the clients' best economic interests. In addition, the Proxy Voting Committee may determine proxy votes when proposals require special consideration.

Addressing Conflicts of Interest. The Investment Manager seeks to address potential material conflicts of interest by voting in accordance with predetermined voting stances. In addition, if the Investment Manager determines that a material conflict of interest exists, the Investment Manager will invoke one or more of the following conflict management practices: (i) causing the proxies to be voted in accordance with the recommendations of an independent third party (which may be the Investment Manager's proxy voting administrator or research provider); (ii) causing the proxies to be delegated to an independent third party (which may be the Investment Manager's proxy voting administrator or research provider); and (iii) in infrequent cases, forwarding the proxies to an Independent Director authorized to vote the proxies for the Funds. A member of the Proxy Voting Committee is prohibited from voting on any proposal for which he or she has a conflict of interest by reason of a direct relationship with the issuer or other party affected by a given proposal. Persons making recommendations to the Proxy Voting Committee or its members are required to disclose to the committee any relationship with a party making a proposal or other matter known to the person that would create a potential conflict of interest.

 

Voting Proxies of Affiliated Underlying Funds. Certain Funds may invest in shares of other Columbia Funds (referred to in this context as "underlying funds") and may own substantial portions of these underlying funds. If such Funds are in a master-feeder structure, the feeder fund will either seek instructions from its shareholders with regard to the voting of proxies with respect to the master fund's shares and vote such proxies in accordance with such instructions or vote the shares held by it in the same proportion as the vote of all other master fund shareholders. With respect to Funds that hold shares of underlying funds other than in a master-feeder structure, the holding Funds will typically vote proxies of the underlying funds in the same proportion as the vote of all other holders of the underlying fund's shares, unless the Board otherwise instructs.

Proxy Voting Agents. The Investment Manager has retained Institutional Shareholder Services Inc., a third-party vendor, as its proxy voting administrator to implement its proxy voting process and to provide recordkeeping and vote disclosure services. Typically, Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. populates ballots for issuers deemed to present potential material conflicts of interest in accordance with predetermined voting stances, as described above under Addressing Conflicts of Interest. The Investment Manager has retained both Institutional Shareholder Services Inc. and Glass Lewis & Company, LLC to provide proxy research services.

Additional Information. Information regarding how the Columbia Funds (except certain Columbia Funds that do not invest in voting securities) voted proxies relating to portfolio securities during the most recent twelve month period ended June 30 will be available by August 31 of this year free of charge: (i) through the Columbia Funds' website at columbiathreadneedleus.com and/or (ii) on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. For a copy of the Investment Manager's Principles in effect on the date of this SAI, see Appendix B to this SAI.

Item 8. Portfolio Managers of Closed-End Management Investment Companies.

Portfolio Managers

 

 

 

Managed the

Portfolio Manager

Title

Role with the Corporation

Corporation Since

Paul Wick

Portfolio Manager

Lead Portfolio Manager

2009

Braj Agrawal

Portfolio Manager

Co-Portfolio Manager

2010

Jeetil Patel

Portfolio Manager

Technology Team Member

2015

Christopher Boova

Portfolio Manager

Co-Portfolio Manager

2016

Vimal Patel

Portfolio Manager

Technology Team Member

2018

Shekhar Pramanick

Portfolio Manager

Technology Team Member

2018

Mr. Wick joined one of the Columbia Management legacy firms or acquired business lines in 1987. Mr. Wick is Team Leader and Portfolio Manager for the Columbia Seligman Technology strategies. Mr. Wick began his investment career in 1987 and earned a B.A. from Duke and an M.B.A. from Duke's Fuqua School of Business.

 

Mr. Agrawal joined the Investment Manager in 2010 as a Managing Trader responsible for derivatives. Mr. Agrawal has been a member of the investment community since 2001 and earned a B.A. in Economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an M.B.A. from University of Minnesota's Carlson School.

Mr. Jeetil Patel joined the Investment Manager in 2012. Mr. Patel began his investment career in 1998 and earned a B.A. from University of California, Los Angeles.

Mr. Boova joined one of the Columbia Management legacy firms or acquired business lines in 2000. Mr. Boova began his investment career in 1995 and earned two B.S. degrees from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, an M.A. from Georgetown University and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Pramanick joined the Investment Manager in 2012. Dr. Pramanick began his investment career in 1993 and earned a B.S. from the National Institute of Technology, an M.S. from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University.

Mr. Vimal Patel joined the Investment Manager in 2014. Mr. Patel began his investment career in 2001 and earned a B.S. from North Carolina State University, an M.S. from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and an M.B.A. from the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Other Accounts Managed by the Portfolio Managers:

 

 

Other Accounts Managed (Excluding the Fund)

Ownership

Fund

Portfolio

Number

Approximate

Performance-

of Fund

 

Manager

and Type

Total Net

Based

Shares

 

 

of Account*

Assets

Accounts**

 

Columbia

Paul Wick

3 RICs

$14.50 billion

2 PIVs -

None

Seligman

 

3 PIVs

$2.14 billion

$1.38 billion

 

Premium

 

6 other accounts

$669.77 million

1 other account

 

Technology

 

 

 

- $143.92

 

Growth

 

 

 

million

 

Fund, Inc.

Braj Agrawal

17 other accounts

$8.03 million

None

None

 

Shekhar

3 RICs

$14.50 billion

None

None

 

Pramanick

6 other accounts

$8.33 million

 

 

 

Jeetil Patel

1 RIC

$12.05 billion

None

None

 

 

8 other accounts

$3.37 million

 

 

 

Christopher

2 RICs

$2.45 billion

None

None

 

Boova

7 other accounts

$8.06 million

 

 

 

Vimal Patel

3 RICs

$14.50 billion

None

None

 

 

8 other accounts

$6.70 million

 

 

*RIC refers to a Registered Investment Company; PIV refers to a Pooled Investment Vehicle.

**Number and type of accounts for which the advisory fee paid is based in part or wholly on performance and the aggregate net assets in those accounts.

 

Potential Conflicts of Interest:

Columbia Management: Like other investment professionals with multiple clients, a Fund's portfolio manager(s) may face certain potential conflicts of interest in connection with managing both the Fund and other accounts at the same time. The Investment Manager and the Funds have adopted compliance policies and procedures that attempt to address certain of the potential conflicts that portfolio managers face in this regard. Certain of these conflicts of interest are summarized below.

The management of accounts with different advisory fee rates and/or fee structures, including accounts that pay advisory fees based on account performance (performance fee accounts), may raise potential conflicts of interest for a portfolio manager by creating an incentive to favor higher fee accounts.

Potential conflicts of interest also may arise when a portfolio manager has personal investments in other accounts that may create an incentive to favor those accounts. As a general matter and subject to the Investment Manager's Code of Ethics and certain limited exceptions, the Investment Manager's investment professionals do not have the opportunity to invest in client accounts, other than the funds.

A portfolio manager who is responsible for managing multiple funds and/or accounts may devote unequal time and attention to the management of those Funds and/or accounts. The effects of this potential conflict may be more pronounced where Funds and/or accounts managed by a particular portfolio manager have different investment strategies.

A portfolio manager may be able to select or influence the selection of the broker/dealers that are used to execute securities transactions for the Funds. A portfolio manager's decision as to the selection of broker/dealers could produce disproportionate costs and benefits among the Funds and the other accounts the portfolio manager manages.

A potential conflict of interest may arise when a portfolio manager buys or sells the same

securities for a Fund and other accounts. On occasions when a portfolio manager considers the purchase or sale of a security to be in the best interests of a Fund as well as other accounts, the Investment Manager's trading desk may, to the extent consistent with applicable laws and regulations, aggregate the securities to be sold or bought in order to obtain the best execution and lower brokerage commissions, if any. Aggregation of trades may create the potential for unfairness to a Fund or another account if a portfolio manager favors one account over another in allocating the securities bought or sold. The Investment Manager and its Participating Affiliates may coordinate their trading operations for certain types of securities and transactions pursuant to personnel-sharing agreements or similar intercompany arrangements. However, typically the Investment Manager does not coordinate trading activities with a Participating Affiliate with respect to accounts of that Participating Affiliate unless such Participating Affiliate is also providing trading services for accounts managed by the Investment Manager. Similarly, a Participating Affiliate typically does not coordinate trading activities with the Investment Manager with respect to accounts of the Investment Manager unless the Investment Manager is also providing trading services for accounts managed by such Participating Affiliate. As a result, it is possible that the Investment Manager and its Participating Affiliates may trade in the same instruments at the same time, in the same or opposite direction or in different sequence, which could negatively impact the prices paid by the Fund on such instruments. Additionally, in circumstances where trading services are being provided on a coordinated basis for the Investment Manager's accounts (including the Funds) and the accounts of one or more Participating Affiliates in accordance with applicable law, it is possible that the allocation opportunities available to the Funds may be decreased, especially for less actively traded securities, or orders may take longer to execute, which may negatively impact Fund performance.

"Cross trades," in which a portfolio manager sells a particular security held by a Fund to another account (potentially saving transaction costs for both accounts), could involve a potential conflict of interest if, for example, a portfolio manager is permitted to sell a security from one account to another account at a higher price than an independent third party would pay. The Investment Manager and the Funds have adopted compliance procedures that provide that any transactions between a Fund and another account managed by the Investment Manager are to be made at a current market price, consistent with applicable laws and regulations.

 

Another potential conflict of interest may arise based on the different investment objectives and strategies of a Fund and other accounts managed by its portfolio manager(s). Depending on another account's objectives and other factors, a portfolio manager may give advice to and make decisions for a Fund that may differ from advice given, or the timing or nature of decisions made, with respect to another account. A portfolio manager's investment decisions are the product of many factors in addition to basic suitability for the particular account involved. Thus, a portfolio manager may buy or sell a particular security for certain accounts, and not for a Fund, even though it could have been bought or sold for the Fund at the same time. A portfolio manager also may buy a particular security for one or more accounts when one or more other accounts are selling the security (including short sales). There may be circumstances when a portfolio manager's purchases or sales of portfolio securities for one or more accounts may have an adverse effect on other accounts, including the Funds.

To the extent a Fund invests in underlying funds, a portfolio manager will be subject to additional potential conflicts of interest. Because of the structure of funds-of-funds, the potential conflicts of interest for the portfolio managers may be different than the potential conflicts of interest for portfolio managers who manage other Funds. The Investment Manager and its affiliates may receive higher compensation as a result of allocations to underlying funds with higher fees.

A Fund's portfolio manager(s) also may have other potential conflicts of interest in managing the Fund, and the description above is not a complete description of every conflict that could exist in managing the Fund and other accounts. Many of the potential conflicts of interest to which the Investment Manager's portfolio managers are subject are essentially the same or similar to the potential conflicts of interest related to the investment management activities of the Investment Manager and its affiliates.

Structure of Compensation:

Portfolio manager compensation is typically comprised of (i) a base salary and (ii) an annual cash bonus. The annual cash bonus, and in most instances the base salary, are paid from a team compensation pool that is based on fees and performance of the accounts managed by the portfolio management team, which might include mutual funds, wrap accounts, institutional portfolios and hedge funds.

The percentage of management fees on mutual funds that fund the bonus pool is based on the short term (typically one-year) and long-term (typically three-year and five-year) performance of those accounts in relation to the relevant peer group universe.

The pool is also funded by a percentage of the management fees on long-only institutional separate accounts, that percentage being based on the source of the account in question, and by a fixed percentage of management fees on hedge funds and separately managed accounts that follow a hedge fund mandate.

The percentage of performance fees on hedge funds and separately managed accounts that follow a hedge fund mandate that fund the bonus pool is based on the absolute level of each hedge fund's current year investment return.

For all employees the benefit programs generally are the same and are competitive within the financial services industry. Employees participate in a wide variety of plans, including options in Medical, Dental, Vision, Health Care and Dependent Spending Accounts, Life Insurance, Long Term Disability Insurance, 401(k), and a cash balance pension plan.

Item 9. Purchases of Equity Securities by Closed-End Management Investment Company and Affiliated Purchasers.

The Fund has a share repurchase plan approved by the Fund's Board of Directors, which authorizes repurchases of the Fund's common stock in the open market at times when shares are trading at a discount from NAV and in an amount approximately sufficient to offset the growth in the number of common shares attributable to the reinvestment of the

 

portion of its distributions to common stockholders attributable to distributions received from portfolio investments less Fund expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2021, the Fund didn't purchase any shares of its Common Stock in the open market.

Item 10. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders.

There were no material changes to the procedures by which shareholders may recommend nominees to the registrant's board of directors.

Item 11. Controls and Procedures.

(a)The registrant's principal executive officer and principal financial officer, based on their evaluation of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures as of a date within 90 days of the filing of this report, have concluded that such controls and procedures are adequately designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the registrant in Form N-CSR is accumulated and communicated to the registrant's management, including the principal executive officer and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

(b)There was no change in the registrant's internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant's internal control over financial reporting.

Item 12. Disclosure of Securities Lending Activities for Closed-End Management Investment Companies

Not applicable.

Item 13. Exhibits.

(a)(1) Code of ethics required to be disclosed under Item 2 of Form N-CSR attached hereto as Exhibit 99.CODE ETH.

(a)(2) Certifications pursuant to Rule 30a-2(a) under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (17 CFR 270.30a-2(a)) attached hereto as Exhibit 99.CERT.

(a)(3) None.

(b)Certification pursuant to Rule 30a-2(b) under the Investment Company Act of 1940(17 CFR 270.30a-2(b)) attached hereto as Exhibit 99.906CERT.


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Investment Company Act of 1940, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly

authorized.

 

 

(registrant)

 

Columbia Seligman Premium Technology Growth Fund, Inc

By (Signature and Title)

/s/ Daniel J. Beckman

 

 

 

Daniel J. Beckman, President and Principal Executive Officer

Date

 

April 08, 2022

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the Investment Company Act of 1940, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

By (Signature and Title)

/s/ Daniel J. Beckman

 

 

Daniel J. Beckman, President and Principal Executive Officer

Date

 

April 08, 2022

 

By (Signature and Title)

/s/ Michael G. Clarke

 

 

Michael G. Clarke, Chief Financial Officer, Principal Financial Officer

 

 

and Senior Vice President

Date

 

April 08, 2022

 

By (Signature and Title)

/s/ Joseph Beranek

 

 

Joseph Beranek, Treasurer, Chief Accounting Officer and Principal

 

 

Financial Officer

Date

 

April 08, 2022

 


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